Duluth bodybuilder talks heavyweight win, his go-to cheat meal and performance alter-ego – Grand Forks Herald

After weeks of prepping for his 17th natural bodybuilding competition, there was a chance it’d be canceled due to the pandemic. “You put yourself through that work lifting and training. … I’m very grateful they were able to do it,” he said.

With face masks and social distancing, the Duluth man competed in — and won — the heavyweight 2020 International Pro Elite World Championships in late October in Kansas City, Missouri.

When gyms were closed due to Minnesota mandate, Sievert exercised daily at home with his set of 20- and 30-pound dumbbells.

“As a bodybuilder, you can’t control who shows up to the stage. You can control what you can and worry about yourself. The main goal is to look better each year and make your own personal improvement,” he said.

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Carl Sievert performs preacher curls during a recent workout. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

Carl Sievert performs preacher curls during a recent workout. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

Sievert, 35, went pro in 2015 and has since placed at many competitions around the country. “Bodybuilding is such an illusion,” he said in a 2013 interview. “A lot of people don’t work on posing enough. You can make yourself look so much bigger if you know how to show your body the right way.”

Sievert took time to catch up with Forum News Service on the sport, his go-to cheat meal and his performance alter-ego.

Carl Sievert

Carl Sievert

Q: What attracted you to bodybuilding?

A: I wanted to be big and strong like my dad and also wanted to be the best I could be for baseball and hockey. I knew I would have an advantage if I started weight training.

After college baseball at William Penn University in Iowa, I needed something to keep me competitive and a new goal and journey to pursue. I’ve always enjoyed training and pushing myself to the limits, so bodybuilding was a perfect fit for me.

I love the sport because it’s like a never-ending project. You’re never done. You can always get better at something. It keeps me motivated.

Q: What has participating in this taught you about your physical, mental and emotional health?

A: Competing and going through everything that goes along with the sport has a huge impact on every part of your life. You really have to be mentally strong in order to fight off any temptation and stay on track.

If you truly want to be your best, you’ll do whatever it takes to get there.

Personally, it’s easy for me to stay on track because of my competitiveness. You couldn’t pay me to cheat on my diet or slack off in the gym.

Finding balance is very important because the sport can consume you. Every choice you make throughout your day has an impact. As you get closer to competition, everything becomes tougher. Your energy levels suffer from low body fat levels, and it makes easy tasks seem way more challenging than they really are.

Overall, I’ve learned that I can push myself to extreme levels if I want something bad enough. I think everyone is capable of more than they think.

Carl Sievert of Duluth won the heavyweight 2020 International Pro Elite World Championships in late October in Kansas City, Missouri. Sievert is taking 2021 off from competing to focus on making improvements, building muscle and he and his wife are welcoming their first child. He'll be back to compete in 2022, he said. (Photo courtesy of Scott Diestler, LiquidSpectrum)

Carl Sievert of Duluth won the heavyweight 2020 International Pro Elite World Championships in late October in Kansas City, Missouri. Sievert is taking 2021 off from competing to focus on making improvements, building muscle and he and his wife are welcoming their first child. He’ll be back to compete in 2022, he said. (Photo courtesy of Scott Diestler, LiquidSpectrum)

Q: How do you take care of your body in between workouts/after a competition?

A: I train one muscle group per day. That way they can recover properly, and I avoid overtraining. Rest and nutrition are obviously very important.

After competition, I raise my calories and focus on growing. If you’re always dieting or always super lean, it’s tough to build muscle or make improvements. The off season is when you improve and get better for the next competition season. It’s a time for your body and mind to recover from a very demanding competition season.

Hormone levels are all out of whack when you’re extremely lean, and it usually takes several months for them to get back to their normal levels.

Duluth bodybuilder Carl Sievert checks his form in a mirror as he performs bicep curls at Anytime Fitness earlier this month. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

Duluth bodybuilder Carl Sievert checks his form in a mirror as he performs bicep curls at Anytime Fitness earlier this month. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

Q: Name your go-to cheat meal.

A: Definitely pizza! That’s usually the first thing I get after a competition.

Q: How has participating in bodybuilding affected your life outside of the sport?

A: It has its positives and negatives.

The good thing is that it encourages healthy habits, and I’m able to inspire others. A big negative can be the way it affects your social life and relationships. It can be a very selfish sport, so having people around you that understand what you’re doing helps a ton.

You miss out on good food with friends and family. Your energy levels are low, so sometimes you’re just not yourself.

Overall, I’ve experienced way more positives than negatives. It’s brought me many opportunities that I’m very thankful for.

Q: You and your wife are expecting your first babe this summer. (Congratulations!) Will bodybuilding be something you’ll eventually share with your kiddo?

A: I would love for our child to pick up healthy habits such as eating right and exercising. As far as competing goes, that’s up to them. I wouldn’t encourage this on anyone unless they had an interest. We just hope he or she finds a passion or something that makes them happy.

Carl Sievert poses as his performance alter-ego Shreddy Krueger at the 2020 International Pro Elite World Championships in October 2020 in Kansas City, Missouri. “In the bodybuilding world, I’m known as Shreddy Krueger, that’s my alter-ego. … When I do the posing routine, I have a Freddy Krueger hat on and I have the glove," Sievert said. (Photo courtesy of Scott Diestler, LiquidSpectrum)

Carl Sievert poses as his performance alter-ego Shreddy Krueger at the 2020 International Pro Elite World Championships in October 2020 in Kansas City, Missouri. “In the bodybuilding world, I’m known as Shreddy Krueger, that’s my alter-ego. … When I do the posing routine, I have a Freddy Krueger hat on and I have the glove,” Sievert said. (Photo courtesy of Scott Diestler, LiquidSpectrum)

Q: Tell us about the evolution of your bodybuilding alter ego, Shreddy Krueger.

A: My best friend and I always watched Freddy Krueger movies growing up. It was also my go-to Halloween costume. Years ago while I was getting ready for a competition, a friend of mine said I was looking “Shreddy Krueger” because of how lean (shredded) I was.

The name and the way it relates to bodybuilding was a perfect match for a posing routine. The individual posing routine is mainly entertainment for the crowd, and you’re not really scored or judged on it.

I really enjoy putting a good routine together and choreographing poses to the music of my choice. I usually go with a hard-hitting spooky dubstep song because it fits the theme. I also usually compete in the fall, so it’s just a perfect time to do a routine like this around Halloween. I love getting the crowd going and giving them something to be excited about.

Detroit bodybuilder takes homes worldwide title of Ms. Olympia – WDIV ClickOnDetroit

DETROIT – Andrea Shaw grew up in Detroit and through years of training, she made it to the summit in the world of bodybuilding.

Within one year of turning pro, Shaw brought the prestigious title of Ms. Olympia back to Michigan.

“It still hasn’t fully sunk in. That, you know, to be the No. 1 female bodybuilder in the world,” Shaw said.

Shaw is from Detroit’s east side and trains at Powerhouse Gym in Highland Park.

“This is the second time that this title has come from this gym. So we’ve made history, even in the middle of a pandemic — and Michigan is back on the map,” Shaw said. “There were some days during COVID that were, you know, not so bright. But, we got to stick to the plan because the end result is worth the commitment and the investment of time.”

Her coach, John Simmons, is former a Marine and said that Shaw’s potential was apparent from the beginning.

“She was willing and able to put herself through a lot more than probably an average person would go through and that’s what made a difference,” Simmons said.

Watch the video above for the full story.

READ: More sports coverage

Steroids, Social Media and Obsession: Daniel Stisen stars in new bodybuilding film ‘Gain’ – Blasting News United Kingdom

Daniel Stisen, who plays the lead role of David, a former bodybuilder himself and was keen to show both sides of that world. The Film is also a love story; David’s girlfriend Paula is played by French actress Péline Liberty. Here Stisen talks about social media, steroids, male body image and the trade-offs that many bodybuilders have to make.

About the film

Sabina: Daniel, can you tell us more about the movie ‘Gain’?

Daniel: The short movie ‘Gain’ is a dark drama, set in London’s bodybuilding world. I worked on the film together with the director/photographer Nick Wall and the writer James Keating.

The main character David, who I play, is obsessed with gaining muscle – every minute of his day is about getting bigger and stronger, there is nothing else. He is willing to do whatever it takes to get to his goal. He is not a bad person, but he’s so obsessed with what he does that he doesn’t see that it’s unhealthy and it affects the people he loves in a negative way.

It impacts his relationship, and his girlfriend suffers as a result. She doesn’t feel seen or loved and ends up struggling with neuroses, an eating disorder and self-harming, as a result of David’s egocentric behaviour.

We follow David over a few days, where his life goes from one extreme to the other, with an interesting twist. The film touches on the themes of steroid use and abuse among younger men, and the need to look good, to be cool, to have the perfect body, to be respected and liked.

It also looks at social media, where people share pictures of their ‘perfect’ life and body. The expectations are brutal in the modern world.

‘Gain’ shows the dark side of this constant pressure, and the price you may end up paying in the long run if you have an unhealthy relationship with social media and body image.

Bodybuilding experience

Sabina: How did your bodybuilding experience inform the film?

Daniel: I got a lot of inspiration from my own life, living in this environment and seeing the good and positives it had for people, but also the dark side of obsession. It depends on where you come from and what your personal reason to start training is. What are your demons? Are you doing this for a healthy or unhealthy reason, do you have good values in life or not?

I’ve seen and experienced this over many years and through many people I’ve met in my life. I did bodybuilding from when I was 16 to 30, and I still keep one foot in the bodybuilding environment that I love.

Sabina: What did you try to achieve with this role?

Nick: My personal goal with this role was to show I can do drama and not just action roles. I want to prove to myself and others I can do both. As well as that, the theme of bodybuilding – the good and the bad sides – interests me a lot. It’s an interesting world, at least the less commercial part of it is.

Film’s main message

Sabina: What’s the film’s main message?

Daniel: I think the film is important since it touches on a few areas that media and films haven’t covered much over the years – the male body image and men’s obsession with getting the perfect body.

The increased use of steroids among very young men and teenagers is worrying – many don’t know what they’re doing and don’t think about the long-term consequences of their actions. It also has a message that whatever you do in life, there is a price to pay. The more you push in one direction the price is bigger, and you lose out on other areas in your life. It’s up to you if you are willing to pay that price.

Sabina: Where and when can audiences see ‘Gain’?

Daniel: It’s free on social media platforms – YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Vimeo and, later on, Amazon Prime.

Later this year, Daniel will be the lead actor in the high-intensity action film ‘Last Man Down’.

Don’t miss our page on Facebook!

© ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Duluth bodybuilder talks heavyweight win, his go-to cheat meal and performance alter-ego – Duluth News Tribune

After weeks of prepping for his 17th natural bodybuilding competition, there was a chance it’d be canceled due to the pandemic. “You put yourself through that work lifting and training. … I’m very grateful they were able to do it,” he said.

With face masks and social distancing, the Duluth man competed — and won — the heavyweight 2020 International Pro Elite World Championships in late October in Kansas City, Missouri.

When gyms were closed due to Minnesota mandate, Sievert exercised daily at home with his set of 20- and 30-pound dumbbells.

“As a bodybuilder, you can’t control who shows up to the stage. You can control what you can and worry about yourself. The main goal is to look better each year and make your own personal improvement,” he said.

Carl Sievert performs preacher curls during a recent workout. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

Carl Sievert performs preacher curls during a recent workout. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

READ MORE ABOUT PEOPLE AND THEIR PURSUITS:

Sievert, 35, went pro in 2015 and has since placed at many competitions around the country. “Bodybuilding is such an illusion,” he said in a 2013 News Tribune interview. “A lot of people don’t work on posing enough. You can make yourself look so much bigger if you know how to show your body the right way.”

Sievert took time to catch the News Tribune up on the sport, his go-to cheat meal and his performance alter-ego.

Carl Sievert

Carl Sievert

Q: What attracted you to bodybuilding?

A: I wanted to be big and strong like my dad and also wanted to be the best I could be for baseball and hockey. I knew I would have an advantage if I started weight training.

After college baseball at William Penn University in Iowa, I needed something to keep me competitive and a new goal and journey to pursue. I’ve always enjoyed training and pushing myself to the limits, so bodybuilding was a perfect fit for me.

I love the sport because it’s like a never-ending project. You’re never done. You can always get better at something. It keeps me motivated.

Q: What has participating in this taught you about your physical, mental and emotional health?

A: Competing and going through everything that goes along with the sport has a huge impact on every part of your life. You really have to be mentally strong in order to fight off any temptation and stay on track.

If you truly want to be your best, you’ll do whatever it takes to get there.

Personally, it’s easy for me to stay on track because of my competitiveness. You couldn’t pay me to cheat on my diet or slack off in the gym.

Finding balance is very important because the sport can consume you. Every choice you make throughout your day has an impact. As you get closer to competition, everything becomes tougher. Your energy levels suffer from low body fat levels, and it makes easy tasks seem way more challenging than they really are.

Overall, I’ve learned that I can push myself to extreme levels if I want something bad enough. I think everyone is capable of more than they think.

Carl Sievert of Duluth won the heavyweight 2020 International Pro Elite World Championships in late October in Kansas City, Missouri. Sievert is taking 2021 off from competing to focus on making improvements, building muscle and he and his wife are welcoming their first child. He'll be back to compete in 2022, he said. (Photo courtesy of Scott Diestler, LiquidSpectrum)

Carl Sievert of Duluth won the heavyweight 2020 International Pro Elite World Championships in late October in Kansas City, Missouri. Sievert is taking 2021 off from competing to focus on making improvements, building muscle and he and his wife are welcoming their first child. He’ll be back to compete in 2022, he said. (Photo courtesy of Scott Diestler, LiquidSpectrum)

Q: How do you take care of your body in between workouts / after a competition?

A: I train one muscle group per day. That way they can recover properly, and I avoid overtraining. Rest and nutrition are obviously very important.

After competition, I raise my calories and focus on growing. If you’re always dieting or always super lean, it’s tough to build muscle or make improvements. The off season is when you improve and get better for the next competition season. It’s a time for your body and mind to recover from a very demanding competition season.

Hormone levels are all out of whack when you’re extremely lean, and it usually takes several months for them to get back to their normal levels.

Q: You mentioned a 22- to 24-week dieting track to help with losing pounds vs. losing muscle. What’s a standard meal at the start, and end, of a dieting plan?

A: The goal is to lose weight slowly in order to keep as much muscle mass as possible. If you lose weight too fast, you will also lose muscle.

By having a longer prep, it gives me plenty of time to cut down and lose weight slowly. You never really want to lose more than 2 lbs. per week. The slower, the better.

A standard meal for me during competition prep would be about 13 egg whites, two to three yolk, and a cup of oatmeal depending on what my current macros (protein, carbs, fats) are at the time.

Eggs are the only protein source I’ve never gotten sick of. My meals are pretty boring when I’m prepping, but I like the consistency and think that is very important.

I eat at the same times every day, and my water intake is always the same. By doing this, I’m able to get a more accurate reading on the scale in the morning. If my food/sodium and water levels remain consistent, I’m able to more accurately track my progress.

Duluth bodybuilder Carl Sievert checks his form in a mirror as he performs bicep curls at Anytime Fitness earlier this month. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

Duluth bodybuilder Carl Sievert checks his form in a mirror as he performs bicep curls at Anytime Fitness earlier this month. (Steve Kuchera / skuchera@duluthnews.com)

Q: Name your go-to cheat meal.

A: Definitely pizza! That’s usually the first thing I get after a competition.

Q: How has participating in bodybuilding affected your life outside of the sport?

A: It has its positives and negatives.

The good thing is that it encourages healthy habits, and I’m able to inspire others. A big negative can be the way it affects your social life and relationships. It can be a very selfish sport, so having people around you that understand what you’re doing helps a ton.

You miss out on good food with friends and family. Your energy levels are low, so sometimes you’re just not yourself.

Overall, I’ve experienced way more positives than negatives. It’s brought me many opportunities that I’m very thankful for.

Q: You and your wife are expecting your first babe this summer. (Congratulations!) Will bodybuilding be something you’ll eventually share with your kiddo?

A: I would love for our child to pick up healthy habits such as eating right and exercising. As far as competing goes, that’s up to them. I wouldn’t encourage this on anyone unless they had an interest. We just hope he or she finds a passion or something that makes them happy.

Carl Sievert poses as his performance alter-ego Shreddy Krueger at the 2020 International Pro Elite World Championships in October 2020 in Kansas City, Missouri. “In the bodybuilding world, I’m known as Shreddy Krueger, that’s my alter-ego. … When I do the posing routine, I have a Freddy Krueger hat on and I have the glove," Sievert said. (Photo courtesy of Scott Diestler, LiquidSpectrum)

Carl Sievert poses as his performance alter-ego Shreddy Krueger at the 2020 International Pro Elite World Championships in October 2020 in Kansas City, Missouri. “In the bodybuilding world, I’m known as Shreddy Krueger, that’s my alter-ego. … When I do the posing routine, I have a Freddy Krueger hat on and I have the glove,” Sievert said. (Photo courtesy of Scott Diestler, LiquidSpectrum)

Q: Tell us about the evolution of your bodybuilding alter ego, Shreddy Krueger.

A: My best friend and I always watched Freddy Krueger movies growing up. It was also my go-to Halloween costume. Years ago while I was getting ready for a competition, a friend of mine said I was looking “Shreddy Krueger” because of how lean (shredded) I was.

The name and the way it relates to bodybuilding was a perfect match for a posing routine. The individual posing routine is mainly entertainment for the crowd, and you’re not really scored or judged on it.

I really enjoy putting a good routine together and choreographing poses to the music of my choice. I usually go with a hard-hitting spooky dubstep song because it fits the theme. I also usually compete in the fall, so it’s just a perfect time to do a routine like this around Halloween. I love getting the crowd going and giving them something to be excited about.

Q: Tips for others who may want to pursue natural bodybuilding?

A: If someone is interested in competing, I always encourage them to hire a reputable coach who knows what they’re doing. This is both safer and you will excel faster by doing things the right way as soon as you start.

If you try it on your own, you go through trial and error and it could take years for someone to figure it out on their own. There are some unhealthy and dangerous practices out there when it comes to losing weight, so hiring someone who knows what they’re doing is your best bet.

Q: If you could have dinner with any three people, alive or dead, (and COVID safely) who would they be?

A: I’m a big hip-hop fan, so besides family I would have to say Eminem, Tech N9ne and Kid Cudi.

Ms. Olympia Andrea Shaw Feels ‘Liberated’ After Move to Bodybuilding – Muscle & Fitness

One of the big stories in women’s bodybuilding in the last couple of years has been the influx of physique competitors who have moved up to compete with the big girls – and have been spectacularly successful.

Andrea Shaw, the 2020 Ms. Olympia winner, made the transition from physique to bodybuilding in 2019. MayLa Ash, Asha Hadley and Reshanna Boswell followed in Shaw’s footsteps last year and all placed in the top 10 at the Ms. Olympia, which returned for the first time since 2014.

When these athletes talk about making the transition from women’s physique to women’s bodybuilding, they all describe it in the same way: as a liberating experience.

“Crossing over into female bodybuilding has been such an empowering, accepting and freeing journey for me,” Ash wrote on Instagram at the end of an amazing year that ended with her placing fourth at the Ms. Olympia in December.

A big part of why it feels so liberating is that, after deciding to switch from women’s physique to women’s bodybuilding, competitors no longer feel as if they have to hold themselves back and they can allow their bodies to grow and improve and fulfill their
potential. As athletes, they inevitably get to a point where they are struggling to stop becoming too dense or muscular for women’s physique. Switching to women’s bodybuilding removes those constraints. “It was like a burden was lifted,” says Shaw,
who also won the Rising Phoenix in 2020. “Now, if my body wants to grow, I can let it grow!”

Like Shaw, Ash had gotten to the point in which she was too muscular for women’s physique. But after switching to women’s bodybuilding, she was able to train heavier and push herself more. It was only after she saw how her body responded that she
realized how much she had been holding back as a physique competitor. Now she says she is “beyond excited” to see her body develop further.

Hadley had a slightly different experience. She had competed in the Olympia as women’s physique competitor in 2016 – at 5-foot-7, she weighed 160 pounds onstage – and then took a few years off. But she had always admired female bodybuilders, and when she decided to make a comeback last year, it was always going to be in women’s bodybuilding. She won the Savannah Pro in her female bodybuilding debut last August and describes it as “the best choice I ever made.”

Female bodybuilder Asha Hadley posing at the Ms. Olympia female bodybuilding competition
Courtesy of Wings of Strength

A lot of competitors who decide to make the transition to women’s bodybuilding have to train heavier and more intensely and to work on bringing up body parts that normally would be “less developed” in women’s physique. That often means putting more size on
their legs to be able to stand next to the top female bodybuilders. Shaw and Ash also both say they never trained arms as physique competitors. Now they do — and they say they are loving it.

It is not just in the gym but also onstage that competitors feel like they are being set free when they move up to women’s bodybuilding. “In women’s physique I never truly showed my size when I posed,” says Ash. “But as a female bodybuilder, I don’t have to
hold back anymore.” She remembers how exhilarating it was when she won the New York Pro, in her female bodybuilding debut. “I was fully extending my lats, I was fully flexing my biceps, I was fully showing the conditioning of my legs and glutes. I was not holding back because I didn’t have to anymore. It was so liberating and so freeing!”

Shaw had a similar experience. But she says she had to make a mental adjustment and learn how to pose like a female bodybuilder. She remembers how, backstage after the Rising Phoenix in 2019, her second show as a female bodybuilder, Margie Martin told
her: “Be big!” What that meant, Andrea explains, was “a mindfulness to squeeze harder, show those biceps, show those legs, because they are big, and they need to be big!”

The word Hadley uses to describe how it feels to pose as a female bodybuilder is “empowering.” “You don’t have to worry about posing a certain way to hide the muscle that you have,” she says. “It’s just about trying to express it as much as you can.” She
says she really felt it during the posedown at the Olympia. “It was all of us up there showing our best and having fun and getting to really flex and show off what we wanted to show off.”

There are probably more physique competitors who are now thinking about moving up to women’s bodybuilding — especially after seeing Shaw win the Rising Phoenix and the Olympia last year. Her advice is this: “If you are women’s physique competitor and
you carry a lot of dense muscle, make the move!”

MayLa emphasizes that the key is to know if you are ready. She recommends getting feedback from judges or experts, as she did before deciding to move up to women’s bodybuilding last year.

Asha says the most important thing is not to be deterred by stereotypes about female bodybuilders. “Don’t get caught up in the label or the stigma,” she says. “If you see that you’re looking bigger than the rest, and you look like to lift, and you get that feedback
from the judges that you’re pretty muscular, women’s bodybuilding is probably where you belong.”

Female-Bodybuilder-Mayla-Ash-Posing-At-A-Female-Bodybuilding-Competition
Courtesy of Wings of Strength

Almost all of the physique competitors that have switched to women’s bodybuilding talk about that sense of having found a place where they belong. “I am a female bodybuilder,” says Andrea. “This is where I fit.” MayLa says almost exactly the same thing: “I know that I’m a female bodybuilder. I know this is where I’m supposed to be.”

Perhaps the most beautiful image that captures how physique competitors feel about crossing over into women’s bodybuilding was from a comment made by MayLa. “It may sound odd, but the only way I can describe how it feels to be a part of women’s bodybuilding is that I’m home,” she says. “I feel like in this division I’ve finally made it home.”

Lou Ferrigno: The Camaraderie Is Missing In Modern Bodybuilding | GI Vault – generationiron.com

Lou Ferrigno talks about the difference between bodybuilding during his era and bodybuilding today.

   

Lou Ferrigno is a legend in the sport of bodybuilding due to his mainstream notoriety as The Incredible Hulk on television. He was also a powerful bodybuilder in his own right that was featured heavily in Pumping Iron. His rivalry with Arnold Schwarzenegger stands out as an epic bit of bodybuilding history.

That’s why we’re pulling out an extended clip from the cutting room floor of the original Generation Iron documentary. In this GI Exclusive Vault interview, Lou Ferrigno details what he thinks is the biggest difference between bodybuilding in his era vs modern bodybuilding.

As a key figure in the history of bodybuilding’s Golden Era, we wanted to take the opportunity to ask Lou Ferrigno his thoughts on modern bodybuilding. Specifically, what he thought the biggest difference was during the Golden Era and the new era. His answer had less to do with the physiques and more to do with the overall mindset and culture of bodybuilding.

Lou Ferrigno first and foremost pointed out that today’s physiques are still incredibly impressive. He doesn’t seem to count himself among the growing opinion that the physiques have gotten worse. He does also take note that the muscle is getting bigger than it ever was in his era. Of course, it should also be noted that this interview was conducted in 2012, so “modern bodybuilding” represents the prime Phil Heath era.

According to Lou Ferrigno, the biggest difference between his era and the modern era revolves around camaraderie. Ferrigno believes that modern bodybuilders don’t share the same sense of togetherness and community as the Golden Era did.

Lou Ferrigno points out the kind of experiences he had during his prime in bodybuilding. Bodybuilders would train in shorts and tank tops at Gold’s Gym. They were unafraid to showcase their progress. They also all hung out, ate breakfast together, and enjoyed each other’s company despite rivalries and battles on stage.

Today, Lou Ferrigno doesn’t see that kind of camaraderie. “The only thing that’s different today is the camaraderie,” Lou Ferrigno states in our interview. He continues:

“Today I walk into the gym and most of the guys wear sweatpants, a hat, they wear sunglasses, they’re talking on their cellphone. There’s no personality because the public doesn’t emplace bodybuilding like it used to be.”

Lou Ferrigno seems to be addressing the modern trend of pro bodybuilders hiding their physique as they train leading up to a show. This ultimately leads to lack of camaraderie. It’s also important to note that he doesn’t blame the actual athletes for this. Instead, he thinks it is a direct results of the public.

Bodybuilders like Arnold Schwarzenegger and Lou Ferrigno truly brought bodybuilding into the mainstream, even if it was only temporary. There was an explosion in the public about what bodybuilding was. It made the entire sport celebritized for some time.

Later in the interview, Lou Ferrigno claims that the only two bodybuilding names people know are Arnold Schwarzenegger and Lou Ferrigno. Of course, that’s not true for the sport of bodybuilding specifically. Legends such as Ronnie Coleman, Lee Haney, Dorian Yates, Phil Heath and dozens more exist on the tip of every bodybuilding fan’s tongue.

What Ferrigno seems to mean is that the true mainstream public don’t know these names. That’s a big difference. Ferrigno thinks that leads to a different mentality for athletes. Lou Ferrigno might believe that the physiques are still impressive – but the spirit isn’t the same.

You can watch Lou Ferrigno’s full comments in our latest GI Exclusive Vault interview segment above. You can also watch Generation Iron on digital today. Click here or the banner below to stream or download!

The Best 10 Functional Bodybuilding Exercises to Make You Look Good, Build Strength and Move Well – BOXROX

Marcus Filly does not follow the crowd. He has developed a form of training that combines Crossfit style workouts with his method of “Functional Bodybuilding”. This strengthens movement patterns, builds muscle, improves mobility and gets him ripped in the meantime!

FUNCTIONAL BODYBUILDING ACCORDING TO MARCUS FILLY

“I’ve used the term “Functional Bodybuilding” because many of my workouts involve atypical strength and accessory lifts that focus on building certain parts of the body. There is more isolation in my training lately than during peak periods of the CrossFit Games season. The movements we are using are still quite functional and do require coordination and balance, but they are being performed slow and controlled most of the time. Developing great control and strength in slower movements has allowed my brain and body to get healthy and strong. I believe for many people this can and would be an effective way to train year round for health, fitness, and personal fulfillment! Not to mention keeping you feeling less beat up.”

Add these exercises into your training in order to target particular movements, build strength and look better.

10. KB Cross Body Split Squat

Single leg training combined with overhead stability and uneven loading from side to side. This is is a great anti rotational strengthening exercise. Loading in the Cross Body pattern will force you to fight rotation to stay vertical and properly aligned. Core activation is elevated substantially over an evenly loaded side to side Split Squat.

Former Pro Bodybuilder Bertil Fox Shockingly Murdered His Former Fiancée and Her Mother – Sportscasting

In a sport full of super-sized men and women, Bertil Fox made some of his fellow pro bodybuilders look like amateurs on stage. After all, he earned the nickname “Brutal Bertil” because of his extreme approach to training that resulted in a physique that seemed almost too sculpted to be true.

But just a few years after he retired from competing, Fox made headlines for an entirely different reason.

In September 1997, the accomplished athlete took the lives of two women who he once planned to be around for the rest of his own.

Bertil Fox achieved tremendous success as a pro bodybuilder

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Born in an eastern Caribbean island called St. Kitts, Bertil Fox and his family moved to England when he was just a year old.

Thanks to some motivation from his cousin, he took up the sport of bodybuilding.

Fox wasted no time molding a championship-level physique. In fact, he won the 1969 Junior Mr. Britain title at the age of 18.

The budding pro continued to rack up first-place finishes in various events before he finally turned pro in 1978.

Four years later, the two-time Mr. Universe winner took his career to the next level by entering the 1979 Mr. Olympia. Held annually by the International Federation of BodyBuilding & Fitness (IFBB), the event grew in popularity during the ’70s thanks to the dominance of Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Fox finished in eighth place in his first crack at the competition.

He jumped all the way to fifth in 1983.

That represented the peak of his success in the sport. Just over a decade later, the decorated bodybuilder retired.

Two years later, though, he threw his freedom away and took two lives in the process.

The former Mr. Olympia competitor shockingly murdered his former fiancée and her mother

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For years, Bertil Fox dedicated his life to the sport of bodybuilding. His tireless work ethic (along with his impressive stature) made him a well-known name in the fitness community.

Away from the stage, he dedicated his time to Leyoca Browne. At one point, Fox was engaged to the young beauty queen.

However, on Sep. 30, 1997, a tragedy occurred in her mother’s dress shop on Canyon Street in Basseterre, St. Kitts. And it involved both the 20-year-old and her 36-year-old mother, Violet Browne.

On that fateful day, Fox shot and killed both his former fiancee and her mother.

According to Sports Illustrated, he got charged with double murder and got imprisoned without bail. A four-day trial held a few months later led to Fox facing a possible sentence of death by hanging.

The former pro bodybuilder testified that the shootings were accidental in nature due to a struggle with Violet Browne over his gun.

However, Fox’s best friend, Edmund Tross, told a different story.

“He said he had shot Leyoca and her mother,” he testified in court. “He said Leyoca’s mother was pushing him out the door. At that point he pulled out the gun and started shooting.”

In May 1988, Fox traded in the title of former bodybuilder for convicted murderer, as he got convicted for his role in the deaths of both women.

From the death penalty to life in prison

Bertil Fox avoided the death penalty and instead received a life sentence for his crimes. | Philippe GIRAUD/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

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Initially sentenced to death by hanging for killing his former fiancee and her mother, Bertil Fox escaped that fate.

A successful appeal to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council led to a change in his punishment.

Instead of getting put to death, Fox got put behind bars for the rest of his life.

His transition from the outside world to prison resulted in him losing a significant amount of size—an ironic price to pay for someone who got paid to pack on muscle. According to SI, he lost about 65 pounds by the time he got convicted.

“Everybody here is lonely for freedom,” Fox said back in May 1988. “So am I. I’ve never been in prison before. I’m locked up all day. I come out to shower in the morning and come out to shower at night. I work out in the cell. That’s all there is to do. I’ve never been in trouble in my life. Overnight, I’m a monster.”

At 70 years old, Bertil Fox remains behind bars.

He will stay there for the rest of his life as punishment for taking the lives of a mother and her daughter.

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How Chang-Hun Chung Stays Fit Like a True Bodybuilding Champion – Influencive

Fitness geeks and bodybuilders focus extensively on their routines and adhere to structured diets. It’s important not only for staying healthy but also for maintaining their physique. Chang-Hun Chung, a Korean bodybuilder, fitness trainer and a German Bodybuilding Champion gives a sneak peek into the life of a professional bodybuilder and trainer.

Being interested in bodybuilding since early years, Chang ensures to maintain his lifestyle no matter the circumstances. One of the many things sources were curious about was how he consumes his meal.

“My meal is perhaps the most important element for my physique. I prepare my meal according to a structured diet plan and I prepare it for several days. Refined and natural ingredients are the key here because you need to make sure you’re intaking natural goods to get the best results.

There’s no compromise on that. I carry my food wherever I go. Whether I’m eating out with my friends or not, I have my prepared meal with me all the time. It’s essential because any compromise on that can ruin what I’ve worked so hard to achieve,” stated Chang.

Chang’s routine seems busy. Being a bodybuilder and a fitness trainer, he rarely gets any time off. “Yes, it’s busy. I’m constantly connected with clients and quite always on the call during work or on the go. It’s a part of me now, and I’ve adjusted my routine in a way that it doesn’t tire me out,” elaborated Chang.

When asked about how he deals with his clients and carries on his training, he stated “I’m connected with them all day. Whether it’s on the phone or in the gym or online. I’ve developed a habit of strictly following my routine without any gaps or compromises. I sleep and wake on my scheduled hours; that is my key to keeping everything all together. When you maintain an organized routine, you can easily adjust things into it without stressing yourself out.”

Chang also invests a lot of his time in studying for new techniques. “It’s just like teaching. You have to be knowledgeable before you can teach someone else. I keep reading about what’s new in the industry or what new exercises that I can try. It helps me to improve my skills and ultimately help my clients,” he stated.

Chang is launching his brand, Physiques Unlimited, that will cater training and coaching services to international clients. He has offered personalized training sessions, structured diet planning, and personalized coaching services, ones that he’s offering to his clients right now.

From 6-7 times training per week, including a cardio session to having a strict diet plan and routine, Chang-Hun Chung ensures to maintain his personality of a champion. However, he’s one of those innovative bodybuilders that are adopting modern techniques to gain extensive progress. The view of Chang’s routine gives a thoughtful overview of his hard work, which deems him truly worthy of being called a champion.

Tyler Manion Talks About Last Season and What’s New for Bodybuilding in 2021 – Muscle & Fitness

At age 26, Tyler Manion is already putting his touch into reshaping bodybuilding. Or at least adding a tweak or two. Calling via Zoom from Pittsburgh, the IFBB and NPC vice president was this week’s guest on Monday Night Muscle. Manion gave hosts Bob Cicherillo and Shawn Ray a recap of a crazy 2020 bodybuilding season and the new changes he has in store for 2021.

Recapping his second year running the IFBB

It was a crazy, crazy year. Once the Tampa Pro started in August, we were rockin’ and rollin’ every single weekend with a ton of shows going on. The bodybuilding community, the competitors, they came out and they packed the shows. Everything was amazing.

On implementing a new universal scoring system for 2021

[It’s] going to be an amazing addition to everybody—the show promoters to the athletes because they’re going to be able to do everything on one site. There should be no more mix-ups with posing music, mix-ups with numbers, with anything. Shows should run seamlessly now. It’s gonna help promoters run their shows much more efficiently.

On future changes within the IFBB

Division-wise, we’re not adding any new ones anytime soon—wellness was the latest one. That’s gonna be it for the foreseeable future. [As far as] changes to anything regarding shows and show format, I don’t know if there’s too much of that for the upcoming year, but I always like to say, whenever someone has an idea, my line is always open.

On bringing back the Masters Olympia

We gotta make sure we have the support and that the athletes are gonna come out and compete. So if we build this up … we want the quality to be there.

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