Healthy Lifestyle Cuts Prostate Cancer Mortality Among High-Risk Men – Physician’s Weekly

FRIDAY, July 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Adherence to a healthy lifestyle is associated with close to a 50 percent lower risk for developing lethal prostate cancer among men at high risk for the disease, according to a study recently published in European Urology.

Anna Plym, Ph.D., from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and colleagues examined whether men at an increased genetic risk for prostate cancer can offset their risk for disease or disease progression by adhering to a healthy lifestyle. The analysis included 12,411 genotyped men participating in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1993 to 2019) and the Physicians’ Health Study (1983 to 2010).

The researchers found that the polygenic risk score (PRS) enabled risk stratification not only for overall prostate cancer but also for lethal disease, with a fourfold difference between men in the highest and lowest quartiles (hazard ratio, 4.32). Adhering to a healthy lifestyle was associated with a decreased rate of lethal prostate cancer (hazard ratio, 0.55) for men in the highest PRS quartile compared with having an unhealthy lifestyle, yielding a lifetime risk of 1.6 percent among the healthy men and 5.3 percent among the unhealthy men. There was no association seen between adhering to a healthy lifestyle and a decreased risk for overall prostate cancer.

“Having a high genetic risk is often viewed as something very deterministic, but our findings suggest it may not be,” Plym said in a statement. “Through lifestyle modifications, early screening, and early treatment we may be able to deal with high genetic risks.”

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Healthy Lifestyle Cuts Prostate Cancer Mortality Among High-Risk Men – HealthDay News

FRIDAY, July 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Adherence to a healthy lifestyle is associated with close to a 50 percent lower risk for developing lethal prostate cancer among men at high risk for the disease, according to a study recently published in European Urology.

Anna Plym, Ph.D., from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and colleagues examined whether men at an increased genetic risk for prostate cancer can offset their risk for disease or disease progression by adhering to a healthy lifestyle. The analysis included 12,411 genotyped men participating in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1993 to 2019) and the Physicians’ Health Study (1983 to 2010).

The researchers found that the polygenic risk score (PRS) enabled risk stratification not only for overall prostate cancer but also for lethal disease, with a fourfold difference between men in the highest and lowest quartiles (hazard ratio, 4.32). Adhering to a healthy lifestyle was associated with a decreased rate of lethal prostate cancer (hazard ratio, 0.55) for men in the highest PRS quartile compared with having an unhealthy lifestyle, yielding a lifetime risk of 1.6 percent among the healthy men and 5.3 percent among the unhealthy men. There was no association seen between adhering to a healthy lifestyle and a decreased risk for overall prostate cancer.

“Having a high genetic risk is often viewed as something very deterministic, but our findings suggest it may not be,” Plym said in a statement. “Through lifestyle modifications, early screening, and early treatment we may be able to deal with high genetic risks.”

Abstract/Full Text

Live longer by making healthy lifestyle choices | Lifestyles | thelcn.com – The Livingston County News

Mayo Clinic News Network

(TNS) – The biggest threats to women’s health and are heart disease and cancer, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The good news is that healthy lifestyle choices can reduce your risk for both.

Heart disease describes a range of conditions that affect your heart, including coronary artery disease, heart rhythm problems, and disease of the heart muscle and valves. And some symptoms of heart disease in women can differ from those in men.

You can reduce your risk of heart disease by:

n Not smoking, or quitting if you already do.

n Controlling other health conditions, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

n Exercising at least 30 minutes per day most days of the week.

n Eating a diet that’s low in salt and saturated fat.

n Maintaining a healthy weight.

The three most common cancers for women in the U.S. are breast, lung and colorectal, according to the National Cancer Institute.

You can reduce your risk of breast cancer by:

n Limiting the amount of alcohol you drink to no more than one drink a day, if you choose to drink.

n Exercising most days of the week, aiming for at least 30 minutes.

n Maintaining a healthy weight.

n Eating a healthy diet, focused mostly on plant-based foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts.

You can reduce your risk of lung cancer by:

n Not smoking, or quitting if you already do.

n Avoiding secondhand smoke.

n Eating a diet full of fruits and vegetables.

n Exercising most days of the week.

You can reduce your risk of colorectal cancer by:

n Eating a variety of fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

n Drinking alcohol in moderation, if at all.

n Not smoking, or quitting if you already do.

n Exercising most days of the week.

n Maintaining a healthy weight.

The pattern is clear, but it may seem overwhelming. You may not know where to begin, or how much difference a few small steps can make. Take control of your health by talking with your health care team about your lifestyle and health history. Then get serious about reducing your risk.

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Average American Thinks Having Healthy Lifestyle Will Make Them Miserable – Newsweek

Nearly half (48 percent) of Americans have admitted that following their idea of what a “healthy lifestyle” looks like would ultimately make them miserable, according to new research.

The survey of 2,000 adults looked at the bad reputation around sugar and found that similarly, 49 percent believe they have to give up parts of their lifestyle in order to be healthier and nearly all of those respondents wish that wasn’t the case (89 percent).

Results also showed that people are still under the impression that eating healthy means eating food that doesn’t taste good, but is good for their bodies (59 percent) and mostly eating fruits or veggies (39 percent).

Salad on table
The survey results also showed that people are still under the impression that eating healthy means eating food that doesn’t taste good, but is good for their bodies (59 percent) and mostly eating fruits or veggies (39 percent).
Flor Mora, SWNS/Zenger

Respondents shared that when they think of healthy lifestyles; ideas that come to mind are someone who knows information about what they’re consuming (43 percent) and exercises about four times a week.

When it comes to being healthy, 55 percent of people are misled by the idea that they need to avoid sugar at all costs and 64 percent claim that they try to keep sugar out as much as possible to maintain that idea of “healthy.”

The data gathered by OnePoll for ONE Brands found that although 68 percent believe they know exactly what belongs on a “healthy” plate of food, many missed the mark when putting their knowledge to the test.

When it comes to what that looks like, the average person thinks a “healthy” plate is 27 percent protein, 19 percent grains, 17 percent fruits, 17 percent vegetables, 10 percent dairy and 10 percent fats.

However, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a standard “healthy” plate should look closer to 20 percent protein, 30 percent grains, 30 percent veggies, 20 percent fruits, and healthy oils and dairy in moderation.

And similar percentages of people didn’t know that nutrient requirements differ by body type (42 percent), gender (40 percent), and age (34 percent).

While 58 percent believe they eat closer to the right amount of all food groups than the average person, the same percentage admit they don’t eat as much protein as they should, and even more revealed they could be eating more vegetables (63 percent).

“Everyone’s nutritional needs vary, which can make meeting those goals feel like aiming at a constantly moving target,” said Eric Clawson, general manager of ONE. “By learning about what your body requires to perform at your own optimal level, you can more easily establish and meet those goals.”

When it comes to sugar, the average respondent insists they have less than 16 grams a day, but Heart.org shows that people actually consume around 77 grams daily, exceeding the 25-36 recommendation.

Nearly half of respondents revealed they were unaware that natural sugars and processed sugars are different (47 percent).

Although people know that fruits like apples (67 percent) and bananas (63 percent) have natural sugar, they were most likely to mistake greens like celery (39 percent), lettuce (39 percent), and cucumber (38 percent) as not having any.

Almost 7 in 10 shared that they don’t even think about the amount of sugar when choosing fruits or vegetables to eat (68 percent).

While 56 percent said they’re likely to reach for candy or other sweet treats rather than fruit when they have a sweet craving, the same percentage said they would eat more fruits and vegetables if they could help scratch that itch.

“Eating foods that suit your nutritional goals doesn’t have to be a miserable experience. There are great-tasting better-for-you options in grocery and convenience stores across the country that satisfy every craving,” continued Clawson.

“What’s important is establishing your own personal nutritional needs and learning about the ways that you can stay on top of your goals without compromising on other things that are important to you to make your choices fun.”

Healthy lifestyle survey results
Nearly half (48 percent) of Americans have admitted that following their idea of what a “healthy lifestyle” looks like would ultimately make them miserable, according to new research.
Flor Mora, SWNS/Zenger

Produced in association with SWNS.

This story was provided to Newsweek by Zenger News.

Plant-based BS! Half of Americans think living ‘healthy lifestyle’ would make them miserable – Study Finds

NEW YORK — Nearly half of Americans admit that following their idea of what a “healthy lifestyle” looks like would ultimately make them miserable (48%).

A survey of 2,000 adults looked at the bad reputation sugar has and found that, similarly, 49 percent believe they have to give up parts of their lifestyle in order to be healthier. Nearly all of those respondents wish that wasn’t the case (89%). Results also showed that many people are still under the impression that eating healthy means eating food that doesn’t taste good but is good for their bodies (59%) and means mostly eating fruits or veggies (39%).

Respondents shared that when they think of healthy lifestyles, ideas that come to mind are someone who knows information about what they’re consuming (43%) and exercises about four times a week. When it comes to being healthy, 55 percent are misled by the idea that they need to avoid sugar at all costs and 64 percent claim that they try to keep sugar out as much as possible to maintain that idea of being “healthy.”

The data, gathered by OnePoll for ONE Brands, also found that although 68 percent believe they know exactly what belongs on a “healthy” plate of food, many missed the mark when putting their knowledge to the test.

Failing the ‘healthy plate’ test

When it comes to what “eating healthy” looks like, the average person thinks a “healthy” plate is 27 percent protein, 19 percent grains, 17 percent fruits, 17 percent vegetables, 10 percent dairy, and 10 percent fats.

However, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a standard “healthy” plate should be closer to 20 percent protein, 30 percent grains, 30 percent veggies, 20 percent fruits, and healthy oils and dairy in moderation. More than a third of the poll didn’t know that nutrient requirements differ by body type (42%), gender (40%), and age (34%).

While 58 percent believe they eat closer to the right amount of all food groups than the average person, the same percentage admit they don’t eat as much protein as they should, and even more revealed they could be eating more vegetables (63%).

“Everyone’s nutritional needs vary, which can make meeting those goals feel like aiming at a constantly moving target,” says Eric Clawson, general manager of ONE, in a statement. “By learning about what your body requires to perform at your own optimal level, you can more easily establish and meet those goals.”

Finding sugar in stunning places

When it comes to sugar, the average respondent insists they have less than 16 grams a day, but the American Heart Association shows that people actually consume around 77 grams daily, exceeding the 25 to 36-gram recommendation.

Nearly half of respondents revealed they were unaware that natural sugars and processed sugars are different (47%). Although people know that fruits like apples (67%) and bananas (63%) have natural sugar, they were most likely to mistake greens like celery (39%), lettuce (39%), and cucumber (38%) as not containing any sugar.

Almost seven in 10 shared that they don’t even think about the amount of sugar when choosing fruits or vegetables to eat (68%).

While 56 percent say they’re likely to reach for candy or other sweet treats rather than fruit when they have a sweet craving, the same percentage would eat more fruits and vegetables if they could help scratch that itch.

“Eating foods that suit your nutritional goals doesn’t have to be a miserable experience. There are great-tasting better-for-you options in grocery and convenience stores across the country that satisfy every craving,” Clawson adds. “What’s important is establishing your own personal nutritional needs and learning about the ways that you can stay on top of your goals without compromising on other things that are important to you to make your choices fun.”

Most people think a healthy lifestyle will make them miserable: poll – New York Post

A clean bill of health comes at a cost: your sanity.

Nearly half of Americans admitted that following a “healthy lifestyle” left them miserable, according to a new poll (48%).

The survey, comprised of 2,000 American adults, revolved around sugar stigma, finding that 49% of the respondents were forced to give up parts of their lifestyles in order to maintain a “healthier” one. Yet, nearly all of them desperately wished that wasn’t so (89%).

But being healthy, according to many participants, meant eating food that’s bad on the taste buds but good for their bodies (59%), which equated to more fruits or vegetables (39%).

While eating healthier might mean you have to ditch the bacon and potato chips, the OnePoll survey, conducted for ONE Brands, discovered people are often misled by believing they have to cut out sugar completely (55%). In fact, 64% of respondents said they try to keep sugar out of their diet.

Nearly half of Americans think living a healthy lifestyle makes them miserable.
Forty-eight percent of people believe leading a healthy lifestyle makes them miserable.

Respondents believed a person who really lives “healthy” is someone who is knowledgeable about what they’re consuming and works out four times a week (43%), and claimed they knew what exactly should be on their “healthy” plate (68%).

The average person thought their plate should be comprised of 27% protein, 19% grain, 17% fruits, 17% veggies, 10% dairy and 10% fats.

But they were way off.

The US Department of Agriculture’s standard for an ideal plate is broken down as 20% protein, 30% grains, 30% vegetables, 20% fruits and healthy oils, and dairy “in moderation.”

In fact, a chunk of participants didn’t realize that body type (42%), gender (40%) and age (34%) play a huge role when it comes to nutrient requirements.

People don't know what belongs on their plate
Many respondents didn’t actually know what belongs on their dinner plates.

That might explain why 58% believed they eat “close” to the correct amount of food groups, although the same percentage dished they probably don’t eat as much protein as they should — or vegetables for that matter (63%).

“Everyone’s nutritional needs vary, which can make meeting those goals feel like aiming at a constantly moving target,” Eric Clawson, the general manager of ONE, told Talker News. “By learning about what your body requires to perform at your own optimal level, you can more easily establish and meet those goals.”

People don't know exactly how much sugar they're intaking
While people tried to avoid sugar in their diet, they didn’t realize just how much hidden sugar there is in what they consume.

The average person claimed they ate less than 16 grams of sugar a day, but the American Heart Association says otherwise. The average adult actually consumes 77 grams of sugar every day, which is nearly triple the recommended dose of 25-36 grams.

In fact, 47% of respondents didn’t realize natural and processed sugars were different. While many knew apples (67%) and bananas (63%) contain natural sugar, they didn’t know celery (39%), lettuce (39%) and cucumber (38%) had any at all.

When reaching for their favorite fruits and veggies at the grocery store, nearly seven in 10 people said they don’t even think about the natural sugars (68%). While 56% of people said they’d probably grab a piece of candy or dessert when their sweet tooth acts up, the same percentage admitted they would consume a piece of fruit if it would curb the craving.

The importance of meeting nutrition goals — and subsequently cutting down on the “unhealthy” foods — directly relates to long-term health. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, people who overindulge in foods high in processed sugars or saturated fat have an increased risk of obesity, heart disease and Type 2 diabetes, among other health complications.

People did know that apples and bananas contained sugar
People knew that fruit contained sugar, but not that vegetables like cucumbers, lettuce and celery did.

But eating healthy doesn’t mean choking down heads of ill-flavored lettuce or slurping a tasteless green juice.

“Eating foods that suit your nutritional goals doesn’t have to be a miserable experience. There are great-tasting better-for-you options in grocery and convenience stores across the country that satisfy every craving,” said Clawson. “What’s important is establishing your own personal nutritional needs and learning about the ways that you can stay on top of your goals without compromising on other things that are important to you to make your choices fun.”

Living a healthy lifestyle is non-negotiable – Daniel Island News

Although summer stretches beyond its three months here on Daniel Island, there is something about those days between Memorial Day and Labor Day that can make sticking with health goals a bit more challenging. Perhaps it’s the holidays and parties, kids out of school, boat rides or just more time with friends and family. 

 

No matter what the occasion is, there are simple ways to keep health and wellness top of mind, without compromising summer fun. It’s not a lack of control, but rather a commitment and a few non-negotiables. 

 

Our health journeys are never linear. There will be ups and there will be downs. The goal is to have tools that will help us get back on track should we wander off track a bit. That is something I work on with all of my clients. At the end of our time together, they walk away with a tool box that they can always come back to. 

 

Here are some tools you can start implementing so that come September, you are where you want to be. It’s not just about what we eat or how much we move our bodies. We must consider sleep, stress and of course surrounding ourselves with the people that lift us up. 

 

Nutrition: Opt to get in as many vegetables as you can throughout the day. Breakfast can be a smoothie with some spinach (you won’t even taste it). Go for that salad at lunch. If a sandwich or burger is calling your name instead, get a side salad. Dinner: Although grilling protein is an easy way to have some delicious healthy food, it also creates something called advanced glycation end product, or AGES. That is literally what it does – it ages our cells. Pair your grilled protein with leafy green veggies or avocado to get some of those toxins out of the body. Create a non-negotiable: Is it sticking to no sugar? Or making sure you are having veggies at every meal? Make it easy! 

 

Movement: Get out there and walk, preferably in the morning or evening when it’s not too hot out. Walking is gentle, effective and a great time to listen to your favorite audiobook or podcast. I have a whole bunch of podcasts that I resort to that get me excited to go out on my walks. Don’t forget to hydrate before and after. Create a non-negotiable: At least 20 minutes of walking each day. Or a morning routine of jumping jacks, squats, and push ups off the wall. 

 

Sleep: The days are longer, but that is not an excuse to stay up later. Try to wake up and go to bed at the same time every day. That will ensure your body is functioning properly to perform all of its daily duties. Lack of sleep can lead to chronic illness and weight gain. Create a non-negotiable: Perhaps it’s no screen time for 30 minutes before bed, or no caffeine after noon. 

 

Stress: A smile ear to ear does not mean that our bodies are not undergoing stress from our environment or daily habits. A poor diet or lack of sleep causes an immense amount of stress on our body. Balance it out with some daily practices. Can you commit to three deep breaths before each meal, or waking up and saying something you are grateful for? Create a non-negotiable: One minute of deep breathing every morning. 

 

Relationships: Surround yourself with people that lift you up, not drag you down. Have friends and family that are not on your side? Show them some love and send them on their way. Are the people you surround yourself on par with your health goals or are they causing you to sabotage them? 

 

Most importantly, never throw in the towel. The day is not over until it’s over. Every little bit counts!  

 

Leeann Rybakov is a functional medicine certified health coach who lives on Daniel Island. For more information, visit Leean nRybakovWellness.com or email LeeannRy bakov@gmail.com.

 

LRC Bavaria transportation assistant makes exercise, nutrition part of her healthy lifestyle – United States Army

LRC Bavaria transportation assistant makes exercise, nutrition part of her healthy lifestyle
Carina Walberer enjoys a well-deserved break after ascending Wildseeloder Mountain in Fieberbrunn, Austria. Walberer, who works as a Logistics Readiness Center Bavaria transportation assistant, believes nutrition, exercise and a healthy lifestyle are very important. And hiking is one of her biggest hobbies and ways to stay active and fit, she said. (Photo Credit: Courtesy photo) VIEW ORIGINAL

GRAFENWOEHR, Germany – Carina Walberer is not a fitness instructor, dietician or nutritionist. She’s not a trained health professional or doctor. But that doesn’t mean she doesn’t understand what it takes to maintain a healthy lifestyle and stay fit.

The transportation assistant at Logistics Readiness Center Bavaria’s Personal Property Processing Office in Grafenwoehr actually knows quite a bit. It started when she worked at two separate U.S. Army dining facilities in Grafenwoehr and Vilseck as a food service specialist and kitchen attendant.

For over nine years Walberer, alongside her coworkers at the DFACs, worked extremely hard to ensure U.S. Soldiers stationed or deployed to the U.S. Army Garrison Bavaria area of responsibility received nutritious healthy meals.

LRC Bavaria transportation assistant makes exercise, nutrition part of her healthy lifestyle
“I’m very careful about what I eat. I eat a lot of fruits and vegetables, and I try to steer clear of unhealthy, low nutrition foods. And I don’t eat a lot of meats,” said Carina Walberer, a transportation assistant at Logistics Readiness Center Bavaria’s Personal Property Processing Office. “It’s really important.” (Photo Credit: Alofagia Oney) VIEW ORIGINAL

“A lot of these Soldiers are a long way from home, and they live in the barracks so they rely on us to provide them with good nutritious meals,” said Walberer. “Fresh food, salads and fruits – it helps to keep them healthy and fit, and it’s really important.”

And the 35-year-old local national employee with the 405th Army Field Support Brigade’s LRC Bavaria practices what she preaches. She, herself, tries to always eat healthy and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

“I’m very careful about what I eat. I eat a lot of fruits and vegetables, and I try to steer clear of unhealthy, low nutrition foods. And I don’t eat a lot of meats,” she said. “It’s really important.”

But Walberer – who as a transportation assistant is responsible for arranging the movement of personal property and household goods for Soldiers, civilians and their families – has another way of staying healthy and fit. She likes to get outside.

“Hiking is one of my biggest hobbies,” said Walberer. “To get outside and get some fresh air, enjoy nature, see something new and beautiful, and get in some good hiking and exercise – I love it.”

Walberer said she has spent many vacation days outdoors enjoying nature and hiking. Her normal job preparing household goods shipments using the Defense Personal Property System and assisting customers with their transportation needs has her behind a desk a majority of the time.

LRC Bavaria transportation assistant makes exercise, nutrition part of her healthy lifestyle
Carina Walberer, a transportation assistant at Logistics Readiness Center Bavaria’s Personal Property Processing Office, enjoys a hike up Buchensteinwand Mountain, Austria. Walberer’s normal job preparing household goods shipment paperwork and assisting customers with their transportation needs has her behind a desk a majority of the time. For that reason, she said she likes getting outside and enjoying nature whenever she can. (Photo Credit: Courtesy photo) VIEW ORIGINAL

For that reason, the Parkstein, Germany, native said she really likes getting outside to enjoy nature whenever she can. Austria is one of her favorite vacation spots, she said, with all its mountains and great hiking trails. It’s not unusual for her to hike for four or five hours in a single day – mostly up – before she has to turn around and head back down the mountain before dark.

“It’s always so beautiful – the views and the nature,” she said. “Once I saw a whole field of butterflies. It was amazing.”

“And it’s good for the body and soul, all that fresh air and exercise,” Walberer said. “It beats spending the whole day at the office.”

“But everybody is different,” Walberer added. “Some people like to go to the gym. Some like to ride bicycles. I like to hike. All are good. All help us to stay active and healthy.”

In October, Walberer will have five years at the LRC Bavaria transportation office. She said she is responsible for a variety of duties.

LRC Bavaria transportation assistant makes exercise, nutrition part of her healthy lifestyle
Carina Walberer is a transportation assistant at the Personal Property Processing Office in Grafenwoehr, Germany. The PPPO is part of the Logistics Readiness Center Bavaria’s Transportation Division, 405th Army Field Support Brigade. Walberer will have five years with the PPPO in October. (Photo Credit: Courtesy photo) VIEW ORIGINAL

“I’m responsible for preparing all the necessary paperwork for the personal property shipments. I also hold transportation briefings for customers, I upload documents into the Defense Personal Property System, and I send all that paperwork to the booking office to coordinate the shipments,” Walberer said.

“It’s a lot of work, but I enjoy it,” she said. “Each customer brings different challenges. They come into the office today, but they’re leaving next week, for example, so it can be hard.”

But Walberer said she and her team at the LRC Bavaria transportation office do their very best to assist their customers however they can.

“It’s my job. I’ll try everything,” she said.

And she said she’ll even try a piece of pizza every once in a while – between salads and healthier meals, of course.

“Everybody loves pizza,” Walberer said.

Good health begins with nutrition, fitness and active living. From guidelines on developing healthy eating habits and ideas on how to stay fit to strategies for giving children a happy, healthy start, Military OneSource provides practical and fresh content as well as initiatives and programs that will motivate people to maintain healthy living and manage their health in creative ways. To learn more go to the Military OneSource health and wellness website.

LRC Bavaria is one of seven LRCs under the command and control of the 405th AFSB. LRCs execute installation logistics support and services to include supply, maintenance, transportation and food service management as well as clothing issue facility operations, hazardous material management, personal property and household goods, passenger travel, and non-tactical vehicle and garrison equipment management. When it comes to providing day-to-day installation services, LRC Bavaria directs, manages and coordinates a variety of operations and activities in support of U.S. Army Garrison Bavaria.

LRC Bavaria reports to the 405th AFSB, which is assigned to U.S. Army Sustainment Command and under the operational control of the 21st Theater Sustainment Command, U.S. Army Europe and Africa. The brigade is headquartered in Kaiserslautern, Germany, and provides materiel enterprise support to U.S. Forces throughout Europe and Africa – providing theater sustainment logistics; synchronizing acquisition, logistics and technology; and leveraging U.S. Army Materiel Command’s materiel enterprise to support joint forces. For more information on the 405th AFSB, visit the official website and the official Facebook site.

Healthy lifestyle may offset genetic risk of prostate cancer – UPI News

Genes can put some men at heightened risk of prostate cancer, but a new study suggests they can undo much of that potential harm with a healthy lifestyle.

Researchers found that among men at increased genetic risk of prostate cancer, those who maintained a healthy lifestyle were much less likely to die of the disease over nearly three decades.

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“Healthy” meant they exercised regularly, refrained from smoking, kept their weight down and favored fish over processed meat.

Men who met those goals had a 1.6% lifetime risk of dying from prostate cancer. That compared with a 5.3% chance among their counterparts with unhealthy habits, the investigators found.

However, healthy habits did not appear to protect men from developing prostate cancer in the first place, noted lead researcher Dr. Adam Kibel.

It’s possible they instead lower the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, according to Kibel, chief of urology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in Boston.

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Prostate cancer is very common: About one in eight men will be diagnosed with the disease in their lifetime, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). But the cancer is often slow-growing, and may never progress to the point of threatening a man’s life: Only one in every 41 men actually die of prostate cancer.

So although men may not be able to exercise their risk of the disease away, lifestyle may matter in the aggressiveness of the cancer.

“One way to look at it is, an unhealthy lifestyle might throw fuel onto the fire,” Kibel said.

The study, published online recently in the journal European Urology, involved over 12,000 men from two long-running research projects. All were health professionals who, starting in the 1980s, completed periodic questionnaires on their health and lifestyle habits. They also gave blood samples, so their genetic data could be analyzed.

Prostate cancer has a large genetic component, and over 200 gene variants have been linked to the risk of developing the disease. Kibel and his colleagues used that information to assign each participant a “polygenic risk score” for their odds of developing prostate cancer.

Each man was also given a healthy lifestyle score, earning one point for each of six factors: keeping their weight below the obesity cutoff; regularly getting vigorous exercise, like jogging; not smoking; and regularly eating fatty fish (like salmon); eating tomato products; and limiting processed meats. In particular, studies have tied those three diet habits to a lower risk of prostate cancer or death from the disease.

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Over 27 years, just over 3,000 men developed prostate cancer, and 435 died from it. Genes made a big difference: Men with genetic risk scores in the top 25% were over four times more likely to die of the disease, versus those in the bottom 25%, the investigators found.

But for those same men, lifestyle also had a big impact. Those who stuck with at least four of the six healthy lifestyle factors cut their odds of dying from prostate cancer by 45%, versus men who adhered to few or none.

Of all lifestyle habits, Kibel said, exercise seemed most important, followed by maintaining a healthy weight.

The findings do not prove that those healthy habits, per se, saved some men’s lives. But Dr. William Dahut, chief scientific officer at the ACS, called the results “encouraging.”

“What’s interesting is this suggests that a healthy lifestyle may not decrease your risk of developing prostate cancer, but may decrease your risk of lethal prostate cancer – which is much more important,” said Dahut, who was not involved in the study.

In the real world, men would not know their polygenic risk score, but both doctors said that could change in the coming years.

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For now, men can get some sense of their genetic risk based on family history, though that’s not the whole story, Dahut said. Having a father or brother with prostate cancer more than doubles a man’s risk of developing the disease, according to the ACS.

Based on the latest findings, Kibel said he suspects that a healthy lifestyle would help lower the excess risk linked to family history.

There was no evidence that lifestyle changed the risk of lethal prostate cancer among men at lower genetic risk. That, Kibel said, may be because few of those men died of the disease – making it hard for any lifestyle measure to show an impact.

However, there are plenty of reasons beyond prostate cancer for men to adopt healthy habits, both doctors said.

“People are generally happier when they’re in good physical shape,” Kibel noted.

He also encouraged men to learn about their family medical history. While women typically have a good sense of that, Kibel said, he has found that male patients usually don’t know if any relatives have had prostate cancer.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more on prostate cancer.

Copyright © 2022 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

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As childhood obesity rises, lead by example to encourage a healthy lifestyle – St George News

Stock image | Photo by ilona titova/iStock/Getty Images Plus, St. George News

FEATURE — Acceptance is important to everyone, but for a child, it is critical. The degree to which a child feels accepted by their peers has been correlated to a number of things: self-confidence, high self-esteem and the ability to perform well at tasks they are given. In short, children who love and accept themselves are generally loved and accepted by those around them.

Stock image | Photo by monkeybusinessimages/iStock/Getty Images Plus, St. George News

The self-esteem spectrum is a reality, and while children can fall anywhere on this spectrum, way too many fall on the low end because of the prevalence of childhood obesity in this decade. Even for adults, physical and emotional health are very difficult to separate. Imagine how hard it must be for a child to think about health.

However, when talking about a sensitive issue like weight, the stress must be on the health factors. Taking a child to a physician for weight issues is important because it may be easier for the child to correlate their weight with health. Scale weight should not be monitored by parents. It should be a gauge of health and measured by the physician, just like blood pressure and heart rate.   

When encouraging children to think about health, remember that words matter. Kids hear everything that adults say. If a parent does a great job at telling their child to love their body but makes negative comments about their own body, the child will know that the parent is not sincere.

Dieting and body shaming are so common in our culture that many people are not even aware they are saying anything negative at all. When children hear their parents shaming their own bodies, it is tough for them not to do the same. The parents’ job at home is to lead by example. 

The following are some ideas to help your children gain functioning knowledge of what it means to maintain a healthy lifestyle throughout their lives: 

Focus on healthy eating. Don’t have snack drawers that are available to children all day long. Be consistent with meal times and snack times. Keep healthy fruits, raw vegetables and high-protein snacks around at all times. Get rid of sugary drinks, and encourage water.

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Set small, attainable goals that the whole family can be working on together for long-term health. 

Start early with healthy eating to instill patterns and habits at a young age. Allow your child to be part of the decision-making process. Take them to the grocery store and allow them to cook with you.

As a parent, you pick and present the food options while your child makes the selection on what to eat, allowing them the freedom to choose what interests them. At the same time, you can rest assured that a balanced meal was presented. This helps children to feel empowered to make their own healthy choices even when you are not around.

Families should try to eat meals together. Children are more likely to eat healthier and to try new foods if they see others eating them. Family meals also slow us down when eating so that we recognize when we are getting full. Don’t make your children clean their plate if they say they are full and they have eaten a fair amount from their plates. 

Keep the environment around meal times calm. Distraction can pull your child’s attention away from what is on their plate. Turn off the TV.

Respect the child’s level of hunger. Hunger levels will vary significantly because of growth spurts and activity levels. A child’s serving portion is the size of the fist, palm and thumb of their hand, not the parent’s hand.

Don’t make food the enemy. Avoid shame and guilt around eating “unhealthy.”  Moderation is important. By keeping the unhealthy choices out of the house, you avoid the unhealthy options.

Encourage positive thoughts about a healthy, strong body and what one’s body can accomplish rather than what it looks like in the mirror.

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Model good exercising habits. If children see their parents or an adult get on a bicycle, they are more likely to follow that path. If parents plop down and watch TV after work or when they get home from school, it is likely that the children will follow their example.

Discuss physical activity rather than exercise. Exercise is a planned, structured fitness regimen. Activity is any kind of movement that requires energy. It doesn’t have to be much, but it needs to be consistent.  

The hope is that all children can learn the importance of taking care of their bodies through a healthy balance of foods and activities. A healthy body image comes from acceptance of your own body, liking your own body and taking care of your own body. Listen to your child and be aware.

Reflect on your own willingness to make healthy selections and work together with your child. Nourish and keep your children strong. Lead by example. Children are always watching their biggest influencer and as a parent, that is you! 

Written by DR. COLEEN ANDRUSS with Healthy Lifestyles.

This article was originally published in the May/June 2022 issue of St. George Health and Wellness magazine.

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