Opt for a healthy lifestyle to avoid diabetes: Study – Zee News

In the young population, arterial stiffness, a new risk factor for hypertension, raises blood pressure indirectly through an increase in insulin resistance but not through an increase in body fat. 

The study was published in Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine. There is a global effort aimed at screening, identification, and early diagnosis of hypertension in order to prevent this “silent killer disease” and its sequelae from early life.

There remain missing gaps in knowledge on pathways through which blood pressure is raised even in normal-weight populations who are physically active and have healthy lifestyle choices. 

It is well known that obesity increases the risk of hypertension. Researchers have recently shown that arterial stiffness, which has been established as a causal risk factor for hypertension in adults, is also implicated in the young population. 

Arterial stiffness may also cause increased insulin resistance in adolescents and young adults. Unfortunately, clinical trials to lower arterial stiffness in adults have not been promising, and clinical trials in the young population are ongoing.

In the new study, researchers examined whether arterial stiffness raises blood pressure via increased body fat or insulin resistance in a largely normal-weight adolescent population. This is because clinical trials in the young population have shown that lifestyle intervention could lower body fat and insulin resistance. 

Therefore, should arterial stiffness indirectly raise blood pressure through any of these pathways, it could be clinically relevant to intercept that path. “We found that arterial stiffness indirectly raised blood pressure in adolescence via the insulin resistance pathway. It is nonetheless surprising that increased body fat was not a pathway through which arterial stiffness raised blood pressure in this general population of adolescents. 

Until results from clinical trials on reducing arterial stiffness in adolescents are available, it may be important for paediatricians and public health experts to focus on encouraging healthy lifestyle choices that lower insulin resistance thereby potentially lowering blood pressure. 

 

Also Read: Obesity could cause damage than you think, says study

Increasing physical activity, reducing screen time, quitting smoking or vaping, reducing salt and sugar intake, increasing vegetable and fibre portion of the diet, and having optimal daily sleep are healthy lifestyle choices,” says Andrew Agbaje, a physician and clinical epidemiologist at the University of Eastern Finland.

(Disclaimer: This information is based upon a syndicated feed. Zee News does not confirm this.)

Study suggests heart-healthy lifestyle is missing in 9 of 10 children in Punjab, Delhi – The Indian Express

A heart-healthy lifestyle is found missing in 9 out of 10 children from Punjab and Delhi, observes Dr Rajneesh Kapoor, a Punjab Rattan awardee and vice-chairman of interventional cardiology at Medanta Hospital.

Dr Kapoor is the principal investigator of a study which has examined 3,200 children in the age group of 5 to 18 years through a questionnaire-based assessment on parameters that affect cardiovascular health.

The intent of the study

The study aims to study the connection, if any, between the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, high screen time in children and a lack of adequate physical activity, and the rising occurrence of heart disease in adults at a young age.

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“If we know the magnitude of the problem, we can address it adequately and in time. That was an important motive to initiate the study,” explains Dr Kapoor.

A cardiologist with over 20 years of practice, he said, “The study was a step to raise awareness in society by giving a real data-backed scenario, giving inputs to authorities in healthcare policymakers, and contributing as a think tank for heart disease control.

The method

Each participant was given a cardiovascular health score based on their responses to BMI, physical activity time, bedtime hours, sleep time hours, dietary habits, and nicotine exposure. The maximum attainable CVH score was set at 100 and subjects were profiled for advice on lifestyle modifications based on their scores relative to it, he informed.

“A score less than 40 was categorized as concerning, children in this needed intense lifestyle modifications starting as early as possible. A score between 70 and 100 was healthy whereas children scoring between 40 and 70 need moderate lifestyle movements.”

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The investigators were more attentive to children in urban areas, as they are more likely to have an access to electronic gadgets, and junk food and may also spend more time indoors.

The results

Twenty-four per cent of the study population had a CVH score of less than 40, 68 per cent featured in the 40-70 score category, and only 8 per cent of all children led a lifestyle that met all criteria needed for a healthy cardiovascular system. “Obesity was seen to be prevalent in 38 per cent of the total study population, inadequate sleep was in 3 per cent but improper bedtime hours were noted in the routine of 75 per cent of children. The body has a 24-hour internal clock. Early or late bedtimes may be more likely to disrupt the body clock with adverse consequences for cardiovascular health.”

The prognosis

Dr Kapoor urges parents to intervene and facilitate changes in their children’s lifestyle to potentially avert cardiovascular disease risk in adulthood. “Most people don’t think about risk factors during childhood but I think it’s actually essential that we all start doing that. Because it’s probably way easier to prevent the development of cardiac risk factors than to try and get rid of them once they’ve developed.”

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A good diet is one where half the food is vegetables and fruits, a quarter is lean protein, and a quarter is whole grain, with a side of dairy, Dr Kapoor suggested.

He said that whether it’s through a formal class or just playing at a park, physical activity should be worked into a family’s schedule.

“The activity should be age-appropriate and align with the child’s interests. Primarily, I suggest lifestyle modification for all. The heart-healthy lifestyle is the one where there is daily two hours of physical activity, a healthy diet, a minimum of 7 hours of sleep in adults, and 8-9 hours in children and on time,” suggests Dr Kapoor.

The study is lined up for presentation at the Innovations in Interventional Cardiology Summit 2022, a two-day annual meet of IIC 2022.

Healthy aging related to healthy lifestyle – Opinion – Chinadaily.com.cn – China Daily

SHI YU/CHINA DAILY

China is facing a rapidly rising aging population, with the number of people aged 60 or above likely to exceed 300 million, or about 20 percent of the total population, during the 14th Five-Year Plan (2021-25) period.

A country is considered an “aging society” if 7 to 14 percent of its total population is aged 65 or above, an “aged society” if 15 to 20 percent of its population is 65 or above and a “super-aged society” if 21 percent of its population is aged 65 or above.

The fact that by the end of 2021, China had more than 200 million people aged 65 or above, accounting for more than 14 percent of the total population, means the country is close to becoming an aged society. What’s more, China’s aging population will grow at an even faster rate since the “baby boomers”, that is, those born between 1962 and 1976, started entering their 60s this year and the number of people aged 65 or above has been increasing at a relatively fast rate after 2018-at an annual average of about 10 million.

China’s population aged 60 or above was 50 million in 1970, about 100 million in 1991 and 200 million in 2013, and it is likely to reach 300 million in 2025 and 400 million in 2033. The trend shows the country will become grayer with the number of people aged 60 or above projected to double every 20 years.

Although China is facing the daunting challenge of an aging population, there is no need to be overly pessimistic about the demographic changes. First, people aged between 60 and 69 years account for 55.83 percent of the total 60-plus-year-old population, 70 to 79 year-olds account for 30.61 percent, and people older than 80 comprise 13.56 percent, according to China’s seventh national census in 2021.

Second, China will continue to enjoy the demographic dividends despite the projected decline in its working-age population after 2012. The country’s working-age population, aged 16 to 59, is estimated to be more than 800 million before 2040. According to the census, it was 880 million in 2020.

Third, the government has stepped up efforts to address the challenges posed by a rapidly aging society. During the 13th Five-Year Plan (2016-20) period, the central authorities optimized related legal systems, improved the social insurance system and promoted quality eldercare services. China had 329,000 old age homes and other eldercare facilities with 8.21 million beds in 2020. And by the end of the 14th Five-Year Plan period, it will have more than 9 million beds for elderly people, with 55 percent of those being in eldercare institutions.

Besides, aging refers to the physiological changes people experience as they advance in age. The only worrying factor in aging is failing health and physical vitality.

According to the World Health Organization, 60 percent of the individual health and quality of life issues are related to lifestyle. Humans cannot stop aging, but they can help maintain good physical health while aging, and a healthy lifestyle can help them prevent and/or manage chronic diseases.

That’s why, a key component of the “Healthy China 2030” blueprint, issued in 2016, is the promotion of a healthy lifestyle and physical fitness. It says maintaining good health is part of individual responsibility.

Moreover, the central leadership’s aim is to build a “Healthy China” by 2035. And thanks to the “Healthy China” initiative, China has made remarkable progress on the health front. For example, the average life expectancy of the Chinese people increased to 77.93 years in 2020, with 37.2 percent of the population doing regular physical exercise.

Yet healthy aging means more than that. It means staying physically and mentally fit. As such, social adaptation, meaning the flexibility to adapt to the environment and its changes, is important for elderly people’s health.

Healthy aging also means ensuring that most senior citizens stay healthy. That’s why healthy aging stresses the importance of the social environment. An aging society requires the integration of health protection and socioeconomic and cultural development. Which means health education should be provided for people at each stage of their life, in order to control and prevent non-communicable diseases.

The 14th Five-Year Plan period is important for the government and society to address the challenges of population aging. More important, individuals and families should realize that healthy aging is related to a healthy lifestyle and maintaining good physical health.

The author is deputy head of the Aging Society Research Center at the Pangoal Institution.

The views don’t necessarily represent those of China Daily.

A healthy diet leads to a healthy lifestyle throughout the year – MyCG

As our bi-annual body composition approaches, it is important that you maintain your active, healthy lifestyle, which includes a healthy diet. 

Maria McConville, a registered dietician from the Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP), offers some tips and resources that will help you keep your healthy diet on track. 

Quick tips to keep in mind during food purchasing, preparation, and eating:

  • Shop the perimeter of the store; consider online grocery shopping for pick-up or delivery to minimize impulsive shopping.
  • Stock your pantry and refrigerator with foods that will help you meet your health goals. 
  • Ensure your eating plan contains these three components: a balance of foods, quality foods, and the most effective timing to consume foods. Refer to this infographic for information, called “3 Keys to Optimal Nutrition.”
  • Practice mindful eating for weight loss. 

The top three resources to help you plan your healthiest meals: 

  1. “Get into Fighting Weight: a Total Force Fitness Guide.” This guide provides five challenge areas we all need for optimal health, and offers a holistic look at your wellness picture. It includes an assessment of your habits, sleep management, and meal planning strategies. 
  2. The U.S. Department of Agriculture in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has issued “Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2022 – 2025.” This guide covers everything from healthy dietary patterns and calorie levels at every stage of life, the intake of fiber, sugar and other supplements, supportive healthy eating for pregnant and lactating women, and charts with types of foods and calorie intakes based on your healthy dietary pattern. Check out the Consumer Resources page here.
  3. Lastly, CHAMP created a “Power Plate” depiction that helps you understand when to best fuel your body and with what depending on the activities you take part in. For example, the power plate shows what to eat when “standing down” or when not in high activity situations. This includes eating fewer carbohydrates, especially those from grains.

“Having optimal health to ensure Coast Guard members can complete our missions in the most effective ways is important,” said Tim Merrell Health Promotion Program manager who also manages Wellness Wednesdays. “Ensuring that our members have the tools they need to achieve their fittest states and in the healthiest ways is my goal, especially as they prepare for [body composition]. If you develop a habit of fueling your body with nutritious foods, you will get immediate and long lasting benefits.”

Join us today as Maria McConville presents at upcoming Wellness Wednesday. McConville is a Henry M. Jackson Foundation (HJF) contractor supporting CHAMP/ Uniformed Services University, a registered dietitian and senior nutrition health educator. She will present “5 steps for meal planning and prepping for weight management” at 3 p.m., Eastern, on CG Teams. Specifically, she will be talking about knowing what you really want from yourself, assessing where you are currently, the power of your vision statement, SMART goal setting, and tips for meal planning and prepping.

JONES: Who’s next for a healthy lifestyle? You are! – The Garden Island

As an introDougtion to my inaugural Q&A column about exercise and eating and fitness and fat loss, I’d like to begin by taking the lead and first asking you a few:

Are you often more interested in pigging out than in working out? Does going to a gym seem to be an endless exercise in futility? Has the proverbial (wo)man in the mirror recently made you reflect upon your own image of health and happiness? Do you want to know the secrets of how to get fit fast (and forever), and perhaps even laugh a little as you learn a lot?

Most importantly… are you sincerely seeking the Smartest, Simplest, Speediest, and Safest Secrets and Scientific Solutions to Strength, Stamina, Stretching, and Sustenance?

If so, then we’re definitely on the same page, in reading and in writing, because… WHO’s on first… and YOU are my perfect audience.

If I’m preaching to the choir, GREAT! Stay tuned. Kudos goes to those of you already working out on a regular basis… becoming lean, toned, flexible, and fit. There is nothing more amazing than a finely tuned body. Hmmm? Or is there? Actually, to me, its unhealthy counterpart is even more of a magnificent marvel.

If you haven’t exercised for years, or forever, then YOU are the miracle in the making. If you are fit-less and frustrated, my new Garden Islander friend, then YOU are my inspiration.

So… why is being overweight, weak, out of breath, and inflexible such a wonderful thing? Why are you a phenomenon because you have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or smoke two packs a day?

Well, for one thing, I am always amazed at the capacity for misuse and abuse that our bodies are designed to handle, albeit even if temporarily. This alone is an absolute wonder… at least to me. You and your body are remarkably resilient, regardless of whether or not your current state of “health” is compromised by years of deconditioning or disease. It often takes decades of hard work (and hardly working) to destroy your body.

For many people, a very forgiving body is something for which to be extremely thankful.

And what is truly miraculous is that when you finally decide to switch gears, it doesn’t take decades, years, or even months to change directions and reverse the aging process. Within reason, anything that you want to change physically can change immediately. IMMEDIATELY!!! Decades and decades of neglect and abuse can stop instantaneously.

And do you want some really good news? Do you want to know what you can do to transform your body and your life as phenomenally fast as humanly possible? Be in bad shape. Period! Circular, oval, or even square shapes qualify. The more “out-of-shape” that you are today can elicit the greatest relative transformation toward your own personal ideal shape of tomorrow, externally and, most importantly, internally.

Furthermore, you hardly have to do anything to get significant results initially. Consequently, it’s not only super simple to shape up, but also super-duper easy. Why? Because the difference between doing nothing and next-to-nothing is tremendous, and your body will respond rapidly and adapt accordingly.

Long-term goal setting is great, but what if you could actually see and feel changes this week? How about this very day?

When exercise is performed correctly and, at the very least, consistently inconsistently, the effects affect everything. The following paybacks from proper exercise aren’t only possible, but always probable. Health is wealth, so invest in yourself and expect change:

• Increase your flexibility in seconds

• Lower your blood pressure in minutes

• Stabilize your blood sugar level in hours

• Improve your cardiovascular stamina in days

• Boost muscular strength/tone in less than a week

• Decrease multiple clothing sizes in less than a month

I’ve seen these results (and more than these results) in my own clients… and in MY OWN MIRROR. Do you want proof? Do you need proof? Unfortunately, I have definitely “been there and done that” a couple of times myself. Fortunately, I have also been able to help a couple of thousand people do the same thing. If you’d like a little more reassurance about the possibilities of a true metamorphosis, please visit my website at the link below to witness my personal physique transformation story and video. And, yes, it’s totally free to watch and to begin learning about the best way to exercise and the best way to eat.

If you’re excited about the notion of a transformative experience, the good news is that your body is ready when you are. And the best news is that it’s ready AS you are! If you’re currently doing nothing, it’s time to learn the right way to do next-to-nothing. And I’m here to help!

So, if WHO sounds like YOU, then who are you NOT to exercise?

This also brings us to my next “WHO” topic. Me! Who am I to tell you anything? And why should you listen to me? While I do look forward to sharing, that’s going to be another story for another time… perhaps next time.

In the meantime, please submit any questions that you may have about health and fitness, and I’ll do my best to answer them in upcoming columns.

In Health & With Hope.

Doug

•••

Doug Jones earned his Master’s Degree in Exercise Physiology from the University of Maryland and has served professionals and personalities as a concierge fitness trainer for decades. As a resident of Kaua‘i and Connecticut, he has helped millions of people learn the secrets of fitness and fat loss. To submit your questions or for more information visit: DougJonesFitness.com.

Healthy lifestyle may lessen dog’s cancer risk [Ask the Vet] – Reading Eagle

Q: A friend’s dog recently died of cancer, and we want to do all we can to keep our own dog cancer-free. What advice can you offer?

A: Cancer is far too common in dogs, particularly large, purebred dogs. You can’t change your dog’s genetics, but there are things you can do to minimize the risk of cancer.

Overweight dogs develop cancer more often than slim ones. Slim dogs also live two years longer than their overweight counterparts, so keep your dog at a healthy weight.

Environmental toxins can cause cancer in dogs. If you smoke, do so outdoors away from your dog, or better yet, quit. Dogs with long muzzles are particularly susceptible to nasal cancer from secondhand smoke.

Some lawn chemicals increase the risk of cancer, so don’t use them, or keep your dog off the grass until the application dries or penetrates into the soil. Paints, solvents and asbestos may also cause cancer, so keep your dog away from them.

While no research has shown that any particular diet prevents cancer, there is some evidence that omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce risk.

Scottish terriers develop transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary tract more often than other breeds. However, some research suggests that feeding them cruciferous vegetables may diminish their risk.

If your dog has a white face or short hair, you can help prevent skin cancer by applying a pet sunscreen and clothing that blocks the transmission of ultraviolet radiation.

A male dog with an undescended testicle should have it removed because it is much more likely to develop cancer than a testicle that has descended into the scrotum normally. An unsterilized female is at greater risk of developing mammary cancer than a spayed female.

Large-breed dogs sterilized before physical maturity are at increased risk of some cancers. So, if you have a large dog, talk with your veterinarian about the timing of spay/neuter surgery.

Regularly check your dog’s entire body, including inside the mouth, for any lumps or non-healing sores. Note any loss of energy or appetite, unintended weight loss, increased drinking or urination, persistent vomiting or cough, trouble breathing, discharge or offensive odor. Have your veterinarian immediately check any abnormalities you find, because early diagnosis and treatment increase the likelihood of a successful outcome.

Q: Moxie, our healthy, indoor, 4-year-old domestic shorthair cat, died suddenly. He was never sick a day in his life, including his last day. His appetite and energy were good. There’s no way he could have ingested anything toxic. Why did he die?

A: I am so sorry for your loss. It’s especially painful when you don’t have the opportunity to prepare for a pet’s death or say goodbye.

I don’t know the cause of Moxie’s death, of course, but if I had to guess, I’d say he may have died of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a heart (“cardio-“) muscle (“-myo-“) disease (“-pathy”). Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, the most common feline heart disease, is characterized by thickening of the heart’s muscular walls.

Cats with HCM rarely have heart murmurs or arrhythmias, and they almost never show clinical signs until a catastrophe occurs — sudden death, acute heart failure or sudden onset of pain and paralysis of the hind legs due to a clot that blocks blood flow to the legs. HCM is diagnosed by ultrasound of the heart, called echocardiography.

Studies show that 15-34% of outwardly healthy cats have HCM. Young to middle-aged cats are most often affected. Over 75% are male, and males develop more severe disease at a younger age than females. Prevalence is highest among domestic shorthairs, which are mixed-breed cats.

The cause of HCM is unknown, though genetic mutations have been identified in the Maine coon, ragdoll and sphynx breeds. HCM is also thought to be inherited in Persian and rex cats, so it may be inherited in domestic shorthair cats, too.

Lee Pickett, VMD, practices companion animal medicine in North Carolina. Contact her at https://askthevet.pet.

Healthy Lifestyle Habits That’ll Help You Shrink a Big Belly for Good — Eat This Not That – Eat This, Not That

Make no bones about it: A big belly can result in a big problem. Excessive belly fat can be the cause of many chronic health conditions, including high blood pressure, asthma, heart attack, dementia, type 2 diabetes, and even certain cancers. If you have belly fat, it’s so important to learn healthy lifestyle habits to help shrink a big belly for good.

We spoke with Stefania Xytakis, a personal trainer on Fyt, the largest personal training service in the nation that makes certified fitness expert-guided training—whether virtual or in-person—convenient for everyone. Xytakis shares with us six important habits to incorporate into your daily routine in order to trim down belly fat. Knowing the right things to do is half of a successful journey. All you need to do is set the plan in motion, and you will accomplish great things.

Keep reading to learn about the healthy lifestyle habits that’ll help you shrink a big belly for good.

nuts and dried fruit
Shutterstock

In order to shrink a big belly for good, consider adding unsalted dried fruit and nut mix to your shopping list for nutritious snacks. Keep these tasty bites within arm’s reach where you spend lots of time, such as your office desk, car, and living room. By choosing healthy snacks to have on hand for a fun treat, you will avoid consuming anything that’s not good for you.

Related: The 5 Best Exercises To Lose Belly Fat and Slow Aging, Says Fitness Expert

mature man brushing his teeth, healthy lifestyle habits to shrink a big belly for good
Shutterstock

By getting into this habit for mundane tasks like brushing your teeth and taking out the garbage, you will help with any muscle imbalances. Xytakis tells us, “This method is a great way to increase your mind-body connection as you’re doing ordinary tasks in a new way.”

mac and cheese with broccoli
Shutterstock

The next time you decide to whip up mac and cheese for dinner, add some broccoli or spinach to it. “You can even throw it in with the boiling pasta,” Xytakis suggests.

Related: This 10-Minute Visceral Fat Reducer Is What Your Belly Needs at 50, Trainer Says

grapefruit and grapefruit juice
Shutterstock

Each time you head to the grocery store, make it a game to pick a different fruit or veggie for that particular week. Xytakis points out, “This will help incorporate more veggies to your diet, and you never know what new veggie could be your next favorite!”

mature man walking to yoga class in order to shrink a big belly for good
Shutterstock

It’s pretty fun to challenge yourself to get in some extra steps each day. It’s so convenient to drive a car—and much quicker! But every step you take counts, and adding unexpected strides will make a major difference in the long run.

senior couple fall hiking
Shutterstock

Probably two of the most important habits are staying loyal to balanced eating and moving around. Both of these are important, because it’s you showing up for yourself. Xytakis tells us, “Caring for yourself and your health is a way of demonstrating that you want to be able to do things for as long as you can while feeling good doing it. It also shows others in your life that you care about them, and you want to be able to be there for them.” She adds, “Starting small, being consistent, and having a plan will help individuals maintain a healthy lifestyle. Also, having the right support in place to provide positive feedback and motivation while making change is very critical.”

Alexa Mellardo

Alexa is the Mind + Body Deputy Editor of Eat This, Not That!, overseeing the M+B channel and delivering compelling fitness, wellness, and self-care topics to readers. Read more

Cycling is a low-impact exercise method that promotes a healthy lifestyle – IWMBuzz

In recent years, cycling has become increasingly prevalent in our nation. For all ages, cycling is a low-impact, enjoyable, and beneficial form of exercise. It’s a great workout that keeps your body and mind active and helps to strengthen your immune system. Cycling is an adventure because of the adrenaline rush that one experiences while pedaling through various terrains. more unwholesome.

Sriram Sundresan, CEO of Firefox Bikes, offers the following advantages of cycling for those who still need an incentive:
Loss of weight Sedentary lifestyle-related weight gain is a frequent issue today. You can sneak mini-workouts into your routine and lose weight by riding short distances to the local store, school, or place of employment. Not only would this guarantee physical activity for you, but regular pedaling sessions would also aid in fat burning. Cycling for 45 to 60 minutes can help you burn up to 300 calories.

Cycling consistently helps ward off a number of health concerns like diabetes, obesity, heart troubles, and other lifestyle conditions. In fact, regular cycling has been shown to control blood sugar levels. Cycling effectively relieves tension; therefore, it positively contributes to mental health.

Reduces anxiety and depression: The advantages of bicycling go beyond physical fitness. When you cycle, you are outside and in nature, which gives you a renewed sense of energy and optimism. Exercise has a favorable impact on depression, anxiety, and stress, but the combination of exercise and exposure to nature has a special effect on one’s emotional and mental health. So get on your horse and enjoy the weather and good vibes. A contented soul is, after all, a healthy soul.

Strengthens muscle: Since cycling involves resistance, it not only tones and builds your hamstrings, quadriceps, and calves but also helps you maintain muscle mass and strengthen your core.

Also Read: Things You Can Eat While On Your Period

UNITED24 has partnered with BetterMe, a leading healthy lifestyle app, used by over 100 million people in 190 countries! | odessa-journal.com – Odessa Journal


In support of UNITED24, the company launched the “Strong in Body, Strong in Spirit” challenge. All proceeds will go towards purchasing ambulances.

To participate, download the BetterMe: Health Coaching app, and look in the ‘Challenges’ section. Each day, it will feature new tasks and tips to improve your well-being.

In celebration of the 31st anniversary of Ukraine’s Independence, on August 31, BetterMe will give away 31 body suits. They’re from ‘The Power in You’ collection, a limited-edition, patriotic drop to those who purchase this challenge. The suits can also be purchased at store.betterme.world. All profits will go towards ambulance procurement, too.

Take care of yourself and help Ukraine!


Healthy Lifestyle May Lessen Dog’s Cancer Risk – The Epoch Times

Q: A friend’s dog recently died of cancer, and we want to do all we can to keep our own dog cancer-free. What advice can you offer?

A: Cancer is far too common in dogs, particularly large, purebred dogs. You can’t change your dog’s genetics, but there are things you can do to minimize the risk of cancer.

Overweight dogs develop cancer more often than slim ones. Slim dogs also live two years longer than their overweight counterparts, so keep your dog at a healthy weight.

Environmental toxins can cause cancer in dogs. If you smoke, do so outdoors away from your dog, or better yet, quit. Dogs with long muzzles are particularly susceptible to nasal cancer from secondhand smoke.

Some lawn chemicals increase the risk of cancer, so don’t use them, or keep your dog off the grass until the application dries or penetrates into the soil. Paints, solvents and asbestos may also cause cancer, so keep your dog away from them.

While no research has shown that any particular diet prevents cancer, there is some evidence that omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce risk.

Scottish terriers develop transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary tract more often than other breeds. However, some research suggests that feeding them cruciferous vegetables may diminish their risk.

If your dog has a white face or short hair, you can help prevent skin cancer by applying a pet sunscreen and clothing that blocks the transmission of ultraviolet radiation.

A male dog with an undescended testicle should have it removed because it is much more likely to develop cancer than a testicle that has descended into the scrotum normally. An unsterilized female is at greater risk of developing mammary cancer than a spayed female.

Large-breed dogs sterilized before physical maturity are at increased risk of some cancers. So, if you have a large dog, talk with your veterinarian about the timing of spay/neuter surgery.

Regularly check your dog’s entire body, including inside the mouth, for any lumps or non-healing sores. Note any loss of energy or appetite, unintended weight loss, increased drinking or urination, persistent vomiting or cough, trouble breathing, discharge or offensive odor. Have your veterinarian immediately check any abnormalities you find, because early diagnosis and treatment increase the likelihood of a successful outcome.

Q: Moxie, our healthy, indoor, 4-year-old domestic shorthair cat, died suddenly. He was never sick a day in his life, including his last day. His appetite and energy were good. There’s no way he could have ingested anything toxic. Why did he die?

A: I am so sorry for your loss. It’s especially painful when you don’t have the opportunity to prepare for a pet’s death or say goodbye.

I don’t know the cause of Moxie’s death, of course, but if I had to guess, I’d say he may have died of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a heart (“cardio-“) muscle (“-myo-“) disease (“-pathy”). Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, the most common feline heart disease, is characterized by thickening of the heart’s muscular walls.

Cats with HCM rarely have heart murmurs or arrhythmias, and they almost never show clinical signs until a catastrophe occurs — sudden death, acute heart failure or sudden onset of pain and paralysis of the hind legs due to a clot that blocks blood flow to the legs. HCM is diagnosed by ultrasound of the heart, called echocardiography.

Studies show that 15-34% of outwardly healthy cats have HCM. Young to middle-aged cats are most often affected. Over 75% are male, and males develop more severe disease at a younger age than females. Prevalence is highest among domestic shorthairs, which are mixed-breed cats.

The cause of HCM is unknown, though genetic mutations have been identified in the Maine coon, ragdoll and sphynx breeds. HCM is also thought to be inherited in Persian and rex cats, so it may be inherited in domestic shorthair cats, too.