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  • Health experts urge public to quit smoking, invest in healthy lifestyle – GMA News Online

    Health experts urged the public to quit smoking and invest in a healthy lifestyle to prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVDs).

    In a statement, the Philippine Heart Association (PHA) said that at least 345 Filipinos die daily due to heart diseases.

    The PHA said among the causes of heart diseases were unhealthy health habits such as smoking and vaping, lack of exercise, and an unhealthy lifestyle.

    “Three decades ago, CVDs were more common in people aged 50 and above but nowadays, patients in their 30s suffer from a premature heart attack,” PHA Director Dr. Luigi Pierre Segundo said on Thursday – World Heart Day.

    Segundo advised Filipinos to invest in their health to prevent these heart diseases.

    PHA Secretary Dr. Rodney Jimenez echoed Segundo’s call, urging smokers to quit as the habit would harm not just the lungs and heart but also other body organs.

    “We will constantly urge you to quit smoking or vaping or perish the thought of trying it because it is not just hazardous to the lungs and heart but to other body organs,” Jimenez said.

    Pulmonologist Dr. Jonray Magallanes, on the other hand, said that smoking can also put other people at risk from heart attacks.

    “Smoking does not damage the lungs alone but causes cancer, stroke, heart attack, and heart failure. And did you know that a smoker also puts his housemates at risk because they get to inhale the fumes,” Magallanes said.

    “The primary smoker inhales the bigger particles of fumes while the people exposed to him/her who get to inhale the smaller particles can suffer from a heart attack,” he added.

    Segundo also said eating food containing trans fat contributes to the leading cause of death in the country which is a heart attack.

    “The bad news is that industrially-produced trans fat has no known benefits. But it is still used in the Philippines and many other countries in cakes and fried foods, repackaged snacks, certain cooking oils and fats that are used at home in restos or street food,” he said.

    “Trans fat, or to be more specific the industrially processed trans fatty acids, are partially hydrogenated fats that are usually from vegetable oil to make the food stable and have no health benefits. They contribute to the top cause of death in the Philippines: heart attack,” he added.

    Meanwhile, the imposition of taxes on sin products has helped the Department of Health (DOH) in its bid to control lifestyle risk factors among the population, according to DOH officer in charge Dr. Maria Rosario Vergeire.

    Citing the data from the Department of Science and Technology-Food and Nutrition Research Institute (DOST-FNRI), Vergeire said the Sin Tax helped reduce the smoking prevalence in the country from 31% in 2008 to 20% in 2019.

    “Malaking bagay po yun dahil yun ang titignan para makita yung risk ng population at saka yung burden sa population cause we know that this kind of lifestyle will lead to diseases eventually, the non communicable diseases, and will be an economic burden also to the country,” Vergeire said. — DVM, GMA News

    A healthy lifestyle is positively associated with mental health and well-being and core markers in ageing – BMC Medicine – BMC Medicine

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  • Gestational diabetes: A healthy lifestyle reduces type 2 diabetes risk – Medical News Today

    Two females performing jumping exercises up a flight of outdoors stairsShare on Pinterest
    A recent study suggests that people who’ve had gestational diabetes may be able to reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes with healthy lifestyle practices. Jovo Jovanovic/Stocksy
    • Gestational diabetes is diabetes that develops during pregnancy.
    • People who’ve been diagnosed with gestational diabetes have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.
    • A recent study shows that for women who have had gestational diabetes, adopting certain lifestyle practices is associated with a 90% reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes.
    • The results held true even among women who were obese or had a higher genetic risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

    Pregnancy can bring with it a number of unique challenges and health concerns.

    Pregnant people and their fetuses require various forms of monitoring throughout pregnancy to ensure healthy pregnancies and deliveries. One condition women are monitored for is gestational diabetes, a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. People who have gestational diabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life.

    A​ recent study published in BMJ looked at modifiable risk factors for type 2 diabetes among women with a history of gestational diabetes.

    The researchers found that the risk for developing type 2 diabetes decreased in women who adopted certain healthy lifestyle practices.

    This risk assessment held true even among women who were obese or had a higher genetic risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

    Gestational diabetes is diabetes that develops explicitly during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can be caused by existing insulin resistance and increased insulin resistance linked to hormonal changes and fat gain during pregnancy.

    A​bout 6-9% of women develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Doctors in the U.S. may recommend testing for gestational diabetes about 6 months into the pregnancy because this is when gestational diabetes is most likely to develop.

    After the pregnancy is over, blood sugar levels typically return to a healthy range. However, for those who have had gestational diabetes, there is a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.

    Dr. Wiyatta Freeman, an obstetrics and gynecology specialist at UT Physicians Women’s Center and Memorial Hermann Southeast Hospital in Houston, Texas, not involved in the study, told MNT that a history of gestational diabetes “is predictive of an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and even type 1 diabetes.”

    Therefore, individuals who’ve had gestational diabetes should schedule regular follow-ups with their physician to screen for the development of type 2 diabetes and other chronic conditions.

    Dr. Kay Lovig, an endocrinologist with White Plains Hospital Physicians Associates in New York, not involved in the study, explained to Medical News Today:

    “Gestational diabetes is diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. During pregnancy, hormones that are made by the placenta result in insulin resistance in everyone. Insulin resistance means that your body does not respond as efficiently to the insulin you are producing in order to have a normal blood sugar…People who develop gestational diabetes have an increase in insulin resistance as compared to someone who does not develop gestational diabetes. Therefore, those who experience gestational diabetes are at a higher lifetime risk of developing type 2 diabetes, which is also a result of insulin resistance.”

    Researchers are still looking into how to best reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes among those who have had gestational diabetes.

    T​his particular study looked at five modifiable risk factors among women who had a history of gestational diabetes:

    1. not being overweight or obese
    2. eating a high quality diet
    3. exercising regularly
    4. drinking moderate amounts of alcohol
    5. not smoking

    The study included over 4,000 participants from the Nurses’ Health Study II. Researchers followed up with participants for an average of almost 28 years. During this follow-up timeframe, 924 participants developed type 2 diabetes.

    T​hey found that participants with optimal levels in all five categories had over 90% less risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

    They found that “each additional optimal modifiable factor was associated with an incrementally lower risk of type 2 diabetes.”

    The risk association held true, even among women who were overweight or obese or had a greater genetic risk for developing type 2 diabetes.

    Sherry Roberts, registered dietitian nutritionist and certified diabetes care and education specialist, who was not involved in the research, shared her thoughts on the study to MNT:

    “I feel that the study was well done and thorough as it followed nurses that had gestational diabetes for nearly 28 years. It looked at the modifiable risk factors of not being overweight or obese, high-quality diet, regular exercise, moderate alcohol consumption, and no smoking. The overall results indicate that the women that were able to maintain optimal levels of the modifications have a lower risk for developing diabetes. The clinical implications for this study provide additional support for the importance of maintaining healthy habits in order to prevent type 2 diabetes. It also demonstrates how important it is to offer prevention programs and support to those trying to prevent type 2 diabetes.”

    The study did have some limitations. For example, it was an observational study, so the results cannot determine the cause. Researchers relied on participant self-reporting, increasing a certain risk for error.

    The authors excluded non-white participants who were likely to have been mostly of European ancestry, which can limit how applicable the data is to other ethnic groups. It also indicates the need for more diverse cohorts for longitudinal studies in the future.

    The study also specifically looked at physical activity based on leisure time activities. The researchers note that further data could look at how other physical activities, such as work-related activity, could be investigated more in the future.

    They also did not have data on the severity of participants’ gestational diabetes or their baseline for blood sugar control.

    Finally, based on the data collection methods and the participants, the full benefit of these healthy lifestyle choices may be underestimated. Overall, the results demonstrate the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, particularly among those with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

    Roberts noted the following areas for continued research:

    “Additional research should be done for women with gestational diabetes that do not have a healthcare background and are part of the general population. Similar research should also be done on the children that were born to mothers with gestational diabetes.”

    World Heart Day: Healthy lifestyle is vital, says doctors – The Statesman

    To commemorate World Heart Day, ASSOCHAM, an apex body, held a webinar titled Dil Ki Baat as part of the Illness to Wellness campaign to cascade awareness and disseminate knowledge about Heart Care symptoms and preventions to lead a healthier and strong cardiovascular health.

    Heart is the most important muscle in the body which pumps blood and oxygen to all of the organs. There are certain foods that can influence blood pressure, triglycerides, cholesterol levels and inflammation, all of which are risk factors for heart disease.

    In view of the same, doctors shared inputs on how to take care of your hear.

    In his welcome address, Anil Rajput, Chairperson, ASSOCHAM CSR Council said, “We must pledge to protect one of the most important organs of the human body – the heart, and any sign of trouble in this organ should be taken seriously as it is a matter of life and death.”

    Emphasising on the importance of maintaining good heart health, he said, “There is no shortcut to a healthy heart. By incorporating heart-healthy habits such as having a nutritious diet, regular physical activity and taking remedial measures through lifestyle changes, medication and regular check-ups are key for maintaining sound heart health and enjoying a healthy life for years to come.

    PadmaShri Dr. Praveen Chandra, Cardiologist, Chairman of Interventional Cardiology at Medanta shared his insights on how a heart attack occurs when the flow of blood to the heart is severely reduced or blocked.

    “The blockage is usually due to a buildup of fat, cholesterol and other substances in the heart (coronary) arteries,” he added. He stressed upon Prompt treatment needed for a heart attack to prevent death and not wait till last hour.

    Cardiovascular diseases kill more people in the world than coronavirus ever will, stated Dr. Rajiv Passey, MBBS, DNB, DM, Cardiologist, Fellow of Indian College of Physician (FICP),  Sir Gangaram Hospital.

    He further said both private and government sector should work together to bring down the losses of lives through this disease as it accounts, he most deaths around the world. The symptoms can be hereditary, breathlessness, chest pain, dizziness, exertion, weakness in limbs, excessive headache. Moderation in lifestyle is vital. Seeking appropriate advice from a good cardiologist at the right time is essential.

    Dr. Sushant Srivastava , Chairperson, Adult Cardiac Surgery & Heart Lung  Transplant,  Artemis Hospital said tests or treatments to diagnose a heart attack include: ECG, MRI, angioplasty, statins, bypass surgery. Cardiovascular disease accounts for 32% of all global deaths. Of these deaths, 85% were due to heart attack and stroke, he added.

    Need some motivation to start a healthy lifestyle? Here are 25 benefits – PhillyVoice.com

    On the heels of back-to-back reports showing that the health of U.S. men compares poorly to those in other affluent countries, and that American women are now living almost 6 years longer than men, clearly it’s the time to restate the case for healthy behavior, and to do so in a powerful way.

    If there is one thing I’ve learned in my journey as a men’s health advocate, it’s that message framing carries equal weight to the message itself. If I can’t capture your attention quickly and describe healthy behavior in a way that brings strong meaning to you – that conveys a personal return on investment – then I’ve lost my opportunity.

    Longstanding misconceptions that positive living is all about drudgery, pain and negative images dominates our culture – despite the glorification of fitness and health. As I’ve reminded you over the years, barely 3% of Americans (men and women) lead healthy lifestyles and, upwards of 70% are obese or overweight.

    That’s why I’ve been ranting since the publication of these recent studies and asking, will the fate of men ever change?

    A strong case for healthy living

    I believe that there is indeed a very strong case to be made for a healthy lifestyle – if presented in the right way. A case built on the vast benefits derived from just a little attention to your daily habits. Outcomes that are intensely personal and meaningful in the core of your soul. Dividends that are well worth your investment.

    In presenting this case, I draw on the evidence of scientists and medical experts shared in my columns over past two years. By consolidating these individual vignettes into a comprehensive list of benefits, my goal is to “super-size” (pun intended) the cause for healthy practices, increasing the potential to create the value proposition you need to trigger action and sustain your commitment.

    At the center of the case, the value proposition I keep referencing, are the activities enabled by better health: quality time with children and grandchildren, encore careers, travel and whatever else you aspire to do that requires physical capacity – essentially, everything in life.

    These are what I call social motivators. The factors that create your “why,” your purpose, your meaning. With a clear focus on your social aspirations, you’ve got the platform to sustain your habits and get you through the ups and downs that everyone encounters.

    The experts on benefits

    Before I jump to my list of reasons to live healthy, let’s review a few high-level points from the experts to reinforce the fact that my list is grounded in science.

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that regular physical activity is one of the best things you can do for your health. The benefits of exercise include brain health, a reduction in disease risk, weight management, stronger bones and muscles, and an increased ability to perform everyday functions.

    Researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health concluded that healthy habits can make a big difference in your life. They studied the impact of health habits on life expectancy and found that both men and women who met a 5-point criteria for good habits lived impressively longer lives than those did not: 14 years for women and 12 years for men. The report notes that people who met none of the 5 criteria were far more likely to die prematurely from cancer or cardiovascular disease.

    The Mayo Clinic provides a great practical example, suggesting that a daily, brisk walk can help prevent or manage heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer and type 2 diabetes. Finally, the Cleveland Clinic reminds us that the benefits of working out extend to both your body and your mind.

    My top 25 list

    So, with the experts on record documenting the science behind these outcomes, here are my top 25 benefits of a healthy lifestyle. When looked at in this very direct and consolidated fashion, I think it makes a compelling case. Now, this is totally old school, but feel free to print this list and post it somewhere prominent so that when you’re ready to shut the alarm and roll over, you may get a peek at them and muster up the drive to get up and start moving. Here you go.

    1. Longer life
    2. Better sleep
    3. More energy
    4. Reduced pain
    5. Natural testosterone
    6. Natural immunity
    7. Reduced risk of cancer and type 2 diabetes
    8. Improved cardiovascular health/reduced risk of heart disease and stroke
    9. Save money
    10. Better mood, more happiness, less depression
    11. Reduced anxiety
    12. Improved mental functioning
    13. Fewer headaches
    14. Less gastrointestinal problems
    15. Lower blood pressure
    16. Lower levels of inflammation
    17. Lower risk of vision loss
    18. Weight loss
    19. Improved sex life
    20. Better skin
    21. Fewer respiratory infections
    22. Better oral health
    23. Stronger muscles and bones
    24. Delay in the onset of disability
    25. Prevention of falls and hip fractures 

    Inspired? This is just the tip of the iceberg. Remember, if you can get your spouse or significant other to join you, not only will you increase your chances to maintain your habits, but you’ll lay the groundwork for a closer and improved relationship – which in-turn, serves as the best source of motivation to keep up the healthy habits. Do you see how this reinforcing circular dynamo works?

    Once you get in this rhythm, there’s no telling what you can achieve and how good you’ll feel. And, most importantly, you’ll have a better shot at keeping up with an active social calendar (the kids, grandkids, spouse and the like) which is ultimately, what life’s all about. A pretty good dividend for about 2 and 1/2 hours a week and just a little bit of discipline.

    In my next column, I’ll rundown the details on the full scope of healthy behaviors. Yes, diet and exercise are at the heart, but you’ll be pleased to know that there is a lot more you can do to contribute to your health and well-being. Until then, I hope this list makes the case and convinces you to start a new journey. The benefits are ample. Give it a shot.


    Louis Bezich, senior vice president and chief administrative officer at Cooper University Health Care, is author of “Crack The Code: 10 Proven Secrets that Motivate Healthy Behavior and Inspire Fulfillment in Men Over 50.” Read more from Louis on his website.

    Healthy Lifestyle Can Prevent Diabetes Risk among Susceptible Women – Bel Marra Health

    Young fit woman eating healthy salad after workout. Fitness and healthy lifestyle concept.Women who maintain a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, even if they’re genetically susceptible to the disease. Recent research has shown that diet, physical activity, and weight control can all play a role in preventing diabetes, even among those with a family history of the condition. By taking simple steps to stay healthy, women can lower their risk of developing this serious health problem.

    A new study published in The BMJ found that pregnant women with a history of diabetes can still reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes by adopting a healthy lifestyle. Five key lifestyle factors were shown to help reduce the risk, including maintaining a healthy weight, eating a high-quality diet, getting regular physical activity, limiting alcohol consumption, and not smoking.

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    It is widely known that keeping a healthy lifestyle can help to lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, less is known about the effect these lifestyle factors have on high-risk women with a history of diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) or if obesity status or genetic risk of type 2 diabetes influences this association.

    To fill in the research gaps, this study aimed to evaluate the associations of the five risk factors to the risk of diabetes. Researchers also assessed whether these relationships changed according to obesity status or genetic susceptibility to type 2 diabetes.

    Researchers found that participants who had optimal levels of all five modifiable factors had more than a 90% lower risk for developing type 2 diabetes than those who did not. Each additional modifiable factor was associated with an
    incrementally lower risk of type 2 diabetes. For example, women with one, two, three, four, and five optimal levels of modifiable factors compared with none had a 6%, 39%, 68%, 85%, and 92% lower risk. These associations were seen even among women who were overweight or obese or had a higher genetic risk of type 2 diabetes.

    As this study shows, the risk of type 2 diabetes can be reduced through diet, exercise and other lifestyle factors. As more research becomes available, doctors will be better equipped to help their patients who are more at risk for diabetes to lower their risk.

    Maintaining Healthy Blood Sugar

    Healthy Blood Sugar Support is an excellent addition to lifestyle factors that can help to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. This unique formula helps to maintain healthy blood sugar levels using a number of ingredients that have been shown in clinical studies.

    The health benefits of this unique formula include supporting blood sugar metabolism and promoting healthy cholesterol and glucose levels already within the normal range. Healthy Blood Sugar Support can also help to reduce excessive hunger or increased appetite, fatigue, and blood glucose spikes after meals.

    A healthy lifestyle may help former smokers lower their risk of death from all causes – National Institutes of Health (.gov)

    News Release

    Thursday, September 22, 2022

    Former smokers who stick to a healthy lifestyle have a lower risk of dying from all causes than those who don’t engage in healthy habits, according to a new study by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health. The reduced risk of dying was observed for specific causes, including cancer and heart and lung diseases. Lifestyle interventions have not been robustly studied in former smokers, and these new findings could have important implications for the 52 million former smokers in the United States.

    Maintaining a healthy lifestyle — defined as doing things such as being physically active and having a healthy diet—was associated with a 27% reduction in the risk of death over the 19-year follow-up period, compared with not maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

    The findings, which appeared Sept. 22, 2022, in JAMA Network Open, come from an analysis of a large group of former smokers who participated in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.

    “I was surprised to see the robust associations [with lifestyle],” said Maki Inoue-Choi, Ph.D., of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at NCI, lead author of the paper. “Former smokers who adhered to evidence-based recommendations for body weight, diet, physical activity, and alcohol intake had a lower risk of mortality than former smokers who didn’t adhere to these recommendations.”

    Quitting smoking is well known to have many health benefits, but former smokers still have a higher risk of disease and premature death than people who have never smoked.

    Past studies have suggested that people who follow healthy lifestyle recommendations, such as maintaining a healthy body weight, being physically active, eating a healthy diet, and limiting alcohol consumption, may have a lower risk of disease and death. However, few studies have looked at the benefit of such adherence among former smokers.

    The current analysis included 159,937 former smokers who had completed questionnaires asking about lifestyle, demographics, and other health-related information between 1995 and 1996 when they joined the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. The participants, whose average age at study entry was 62.6 years, were followed for approximately 19 years. During the follow-up period, which extended through 2019, 86,127 participants died. Death information, including cause of death, came from the National Death Index.

    For each participant, the researchers calculated a total adherence score ranging from no adherence to full adherence. The total adherence score incorporated individual scores for body mass index, based on guidelines from the World Health Organization; for dietary quality, based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010-2015; for physical activity, based on the second edition of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans; and for alcohol use, based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025.

    Former smokers who had the highest total adherence scores had a 27% lower risk of death from any cause than those with the lowest scores. In addition, participants with the highest scores had a 24% reduction in risk of death from cancer, 28% reduction in risk of death from cardiovascular disease, and 30% reduction in risk of death from respiratory disease. The reductions in risk of death were observed regardless of health status, other health conditions, how many cigarettes participants used to smoke per day, years since they quit, and age they began smoking.

    The researchers also evaluated the benefit from adherence for individual lifestyle recommendations. In each case, people with the highest score had a lower risk of death than those with the lowest score: 17% lower for physical activity, 14% lower for body weight, 9% lower for diet quality, and 4% lower for alcohol intake.

    “To have the greatest benefit, it is better to adhere to many lifestyle recommendations,” Dr. Inoue-Choi noted. “But even those who adopted just a single lifestyle recommendation experienced benefits.”

    The researchers cautioned that studies based on self-reported data can only show associations, not establish cause and effect. Although the researchers controlled for many factors that could have confounded the associations, they said they cannot rule out the possibility that other factors may have affected the associations they observed.

    The researchers also noted that more studies are needed to explore the associations between adhering to lifestyle recommendations and risk of death among former smokers in more diverse populations.

    “The NIH-AARP study is a predominantly White population with relatively high socioeconomic status,” Dr. Inoue-Choi said. “These research questions need to be extended to other populations.”

    About the National Cancer Institute (NCI): NCI leads the National Cancer Program and NIH’s efforts to dramatically reduce the prevalence of cancer and improve the lives of people with cancer. NCI supports a wide range of cancer research and training extramurally through grants and contracts. NCI’s intramural research program conducts innovative, transdisciplinary basic, translational, clinical, and epidemiological research on the causes of cancer, avenues for prevention, risk prediction, early detection, and treatment, including research at the NIH Clinical Center—the world’s largest research hospital. Learn more about NCI’s intramural research from the Center for Cancer Research and the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics. For more information about cancer, please visit the NCI website at cancer.gov or call NCI’s contact center at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237).

    About the National Institutes of Health (NIH):
    NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

    NIH…Turning Discovery Into Health®

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    Healthy lifestyle behaviors may lower risk for dementia in type 2 diabetes – Healio

    September 21, 2022

    1 min read

    Source:

    Boonpor J, et al. SO 319. Presented at: European Association for the Study of Diabetes Annual Meeting; Sept. 19-23, 2022; Stockholm (hybrid meeting).

    Disclosures: Boonpor reports no relevant financial disclosures.

    Living a healthier lifestyle can lower the risk for dementia for adults with type 2 diabetes, according to a speaker at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual meeting.

    “We know type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for dementia,” Jirapitcha Boonpor, a PhD student in the School of Cardiovascular and Metabolic Health at the University of Glasgow, U.K., said during a presentation. “Thirty-five percent of dementia risk is caused by modifiable risk factors. However, the link between lifestyle, type 2 diabetes and dementia is unclear. This study aims to investigate to what extent the association between type 2 diabetes and dementia risk is modified by lifestyle.”

    Living a healthy lifestyle reduces the risk for dementia in adults with type 2 diabetes.
    Adults with type 2 diabetes have a lower risk for developing dementia if they live a healthy lifestyle vs. living an unhealthy lifestyle. Data were derived from Boonpor J, et al. SO 319. Presented at: European Association for the Study of Diabetes Annual Meeting; Sept. 19-23, 2022; Stockholm (hybrid meeting).

    Researchers conducted a prospective cohort study of 445,364 adults in the UK Biobank (mean age, 55.6 years; 54.6% women). Adults self-reported whether they had type 2 diabetes. Incident dementia was identified from inpatient hospital records. Researchers analyzed nine self-reported lifestyle behaviors: TV viewing time, physical activity, sleep duration, smoking status, alcohol consumption and eating processed meat, red meat, fruits and vegetables, and oily fish. An unhealthy risk score was calculated, with a score of zero defined as having the healthiest lifestyle and a score of seven defined as having the least healthy lifestyle.

    The cohort was followed for a median of 9.1 years. Adults with type 2 diabetes had a higher risk for developing dementia than those without diabetes (HR = 1.33; 95% CI, 1.16-1.53; P < .0001). Adults who had an unhealthy lifestyle risk score of seven had an increased risk for dementia compared with those with a risk score of zero (HR = 1.65; 95% CI, 1.08-2.52; P = .02).

    Adults without type 2 diabetes and the healthiest lifestyle had a lower risk for dementia than those without type 2 diabetes and the least healthy lifestyle (HR = 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59-0.9; P = .003). Similarly, adults with type 2 diabetes and the healthiest lifestyle risk score had a decreased risk for dementia compared with adults with diabetes and the least healthy lifestyle (HR = 0.55; 95% CI, 0.38-0.92; P = .003).

    “Having type 2 diabetes increases the chance of developing dementia, but this could be reduced if people with type 2 diabetes comply with healthy lifestyle behaviors,” Boonpor said. “There is no treatment for dementia, so prevention is more important.”